Houston


Photo: North Carolina National Guard/CC BY-ND 2.0 (Flickr)

What Scott Pruitt Still Gets Wrong About Chemical Safety Post-Hurricane Harvey

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

In a recent interview with ABC’s “Powerhouse Politics” podcast, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt was asked about the agency’s role in responding to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey and the devastation caused in Florida and Texas by the natural disasters. During the conversation, one of the hosts asked Administrator Pruitt about the EPA’s Risk Management Plan (RMP) rule and his decision to delay implementation of the amendments to modernize the standards for chemical facility safety (relevant because a chemical plant covered by this rule exploded after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston). Read more >

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Recovery After Hurricane Harvey: Will There Be Justice for All?

, researcher, Center for Science & Democracy

What happens to Houston after the media coverage storm subsides, when the country has moved on from the reality that is the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey? Will the people of Houston, who will be affected by this devastation financially and emotionally for years to come, soon become just yesterday’s headline? I would hope not. But recent history shows we should be concerned. Read more >

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What’s the Connection Between Climate Change and Hurricane Harvey?

, senior climate scientist

As Hurricane Harvey slipped back offshore of Texas and then like a pinwheel spun back over to Louisiana and is now moving further inland on a northeast trajectory, questions are already being asked: Is this storm unprecedented? Are there telltale signs of climate change? Read more >

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Ozone in Houston: Combatting Misinformation and Protecting Public Health

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

As I’ve been following, the Environmental Protection Agency is in the process of updating the national ambient air quality standard for ozone pollution. The standard is likely to be strengthened below the current standard of 75 ppb, due to the compelling scientific evidence linking ozone to adverse health impacts at this concentration. The EPA has proposed a standard between 65 and 70 ppb, narrowing the range advised by its independent science committee of 60-70 ppb, and the agency will issue a final rule by October. Read more >

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