midwest


Midwest States Finally Catching on to Solar Power’s Potential

, energy analyst

Michigan and Minnesota are catching on and the solar power movement is now gaining a foothold in the Midwest. Read more >

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We’ve Got More Than Enough Corn

, director, Food & Environment Program

Nowhere is the power and prowess of agricultural science so evident as in the Midwestern Corn Belt. More of this nation’s economic success and global dominance is due to the corn plant than most Americans realize. In fact, the reason most of us can be oblivious to that very fact—as we busily flit about our non-agricultural lives—owes to the crop’s exceptional productivity and its congenial malleability to our purposes. Read more >

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Yes, Actually There Is a Bright Way Forward for Midwestern Agriculture

, director, Food & Environment Program

Picture this bright future: Farmers large and small, commodity groups, conservationists, government agencies, university researchers, federal funders and private philanthropies all agreeing on one thing. And that one thing is how you can practice agriculture while reducing environmental impact, improving water quality, protecting wildlife and producing alternative energy. Read more >

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Ohio Senate President Stacks the Deck against Renewable Energy

, energy analyst

Ohio’s clean energy standards may never get the evidence and science-based review that was promised. Last week, Ohio senate president Keith Faber appointed outspoken opponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency to a committee supposedly intended to do an objective review of Ohio’s clean energy standards. Most disappointing is the inclusion of Senator Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), who has waged a biased and misleading campaign against Ohio’s clean energy standards for the past two years. Read more >

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Torrential Rain during the World Cup in Brazil, while the U.S. Midwest Floods

, climate scientist

In the hours before yesterday’s World Cup football match between the U.S. and Germany, the Brazilian city of Recife was hit by a torrential downpour. A coastal city of 1.5 million people, Recife is used to high humidity and rainfall.  But with streets flooded to waist level in some places, players, officials and fans had a tough time even making it to the stadium for the game. Read more >

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