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Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

How Rocket Science Can Benefit Transportation

Guest Bogger

Michael Wright, NASA engineer

Glen Rock, PA

As a NASA engineer and father of three, there are two things that I consider important: space exploration and climate change. Unfortunately, neither space nor climate change are receiving the attention they deserve from policy makers and the public. Fortunately, my 30-year career at NASA has given me the opportunity to become involved in both. Read More

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#ScioDC: A Conversation on Scientists, Government, and Social Media This Week

This Wednesday, I’ll be speaking at the inaugural event of ScienceOnlineDC about the recent UCS report I co-authored, Grading Government Transparency: Scientists’ Freedom to Speak (and Tweet) at Federal Agencies. ScienceOnlineDC is a newly formed Washington, DC satellite of ScienceOnline, a nonprofit organization that facilitates conversations, community, and collaborations at the intersection of science and the Web. Read More

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Freedom to Tweet: Grading Social Media Policies in the Federal Government

Social media can transform debates, inform discussions and, as we saw with the Arab spring, help spread democracy. And information and science have a key role to play in democracy (hence the new Center for Science and Democracy here at UCS). Scientists working for government agencies such as NASA, NOAA, the EPA, and the FDA have a lot to contribute to discussions about the science-based challenges we face. Unfortunately, agency policies combined with a culture of timidity are often constraining individual government scientists from jumping into social media. Read More

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Ice Found on Mercury…But Sadly, No Life

NASA revealed new evidence that significant deposits of water ice can be found on Mercury’s poles in three papers published today in Science Express. In a press conference this afternoon, participating scientists said the ice in some parts could be as thick as twenty meters in places that are thermally stable. Read More

Categories: Scientific Integrity  

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We’re NASA and We Know It Makes Me LMFAO (with Curiosity)

Sure, you can watch the actual Mars rover Curiosity landing. And sure, you can watch people dance to LMFAO’s “We’re Sexy and We Know It.” But it did not seem possible that the two could be related. Until yesterday. Read More

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Sally Ride: 1951-2012

Yesterday, the world suffered a great loss with the passing of Dr. Sally K. Ride. Dr. Ride was a brave explorer, passionate educator, brilliant scientist, and complex human being. Her impact and her absence will be long felt. Read More

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Why Must NASA Scientific Integrity Policy be so Daunting and Difficult to Navigate?

In an email yesterday to NASA employees (reproduced below), NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati reaffirmed the agency’s commitment to scientific integrity, touting the scientific integrity policy NASA finalized in December.  If only the scientists who work there could navigate through it. Read More

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Countdown: Where to Watch the Space Shuttle Discovery Fly by Washington, D.C.

Tomorrow morning, weather permitting, we’ll be treated to a once-in-a-lifetime experience: the Space Shuttle Discovery will fly over Washington, D.C. on its way to its new home at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. Here are some pointers on how you can best view the shuttle, both virtually and in person. I’ll update this post over the next 24 hours as more specifics become available. I also plan on posting photos from readers who are able to catch a glimpse. [UPDATED with more photos 12:30 p.m. 4/18]
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Categories: Scientific Integrity  

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The Blue Marble 2012, an Incredible Image of the Pale Blue Dot

A new federal government satellite is now capturing the imagination of millions of Americans. I can guarantee that you’ve never seen an image of the Earth like the ones just released by NASA. Read More

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An Image Worth A Thousand Words

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), from its Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), just released an updated analysis that indicates 2011 was the ninth warmest year on record for the planet. GISS Director James Hansen said: “Even with the cooling effects of a strong La Niña influence and low solar activity for the past several years, 2011 was one of the 10 warmest years on record.”  Read More

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