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Posts Tagged ‘nuclear power’

New Book “Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster” Released

This week we officially released our book Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster, published by New Press and co-authored by UCS nuclear experts Dave Lochbaum and Ed Lyman, and journalist Susan Q. Stranahan. Susan for many years was a journalist with the Philadelphia Inquirer, and was the lead reporter of the Inquirer’s Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident. Read More

Categories: Nuclear Power  

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Climate Change and Nuclear Power

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) recently received by email an open letter by four nuclear scientists and engineers—Andrew C. Kadak, Richard A. Meserve, Neil E. Todreas, and Richard Wilson—titled “Nuclear Power’s Role in Responding to Climate Change.” Below we look at some of their arguments. Read More

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Climate Science, Nuclear Power, and a Renewable Energy Future

Contrary to the public assertions made this week by some of our climate scientist friends, nuclear power is likely to have a limited near-term role in avoiding the worst impacts of climate change. Renewable energy technologies are cheaper, less risky, and ready for deployment today. A look at where things stand with both nuclear and renewables bears all that out. Read More

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Energy-Water Collisions: A Shared Concern for State Utility Regulators

Last week, I presented the key findings from our new report Water-Smart Power: Strengthening the U.S. Electricity System in a Warming World to state utility regulators and their staff at the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) Summer Meetings in Denver. Read More

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News on Energy Alternatives—Wind, Efficiency Are In, Small Nukes Are Out

Investors working with utilities are making clear and clean choices for meeting our energy needs.  Two big announcements show wind and energy efficiency are financeable and attractive, and new small nuclear reactors are not.  Recently MidAmerican Energy chose to add more wind energy to its supply, dump a “modular” nuclear plant proposal,and decline to follow the trend toward burning natural gas. Read More

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Solar Dawns on Southern Tea Parties

Competition in the electric utility industry came after a nationwide flood of nuclear power cost over-runs. History is now repeating in Georgia and Florida, where popular reaction against uneconomic nuclear power is in bright contrast with support for solar energy. I wrote last week that the utilities resistance to solar makes sense only to the incumbent utility with an old business model. Read More

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Nuclear vs. Solar: Corporate Profits and Public Risk

In the Sunshine State (Florida) and nearby states of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, proposals for new nuclear power plants stand in stark contrast to lower risk, less expensive energy alternatives. Consumers in these states have already donated $6 Billion to the utilities’ nuclear ambitions. Read More

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Buyer Beware: Midwest Utilities Experience Coal Plant Sticker Shock; Will New Nuclear Do the Same for the South?

Don’t you hate it when you’re quoted a price for a new car over the phone or online, but when you get to the dealership they inform you the price is actually hundreds (or even thousands) of dollars more than they said it would be? Imagine how you’d feel if the price was millions or even billions of dollars more. Read More

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Disputes and Rising Costs Spell Trouble for the Vogtle Nuclear Plant

On February 9, 2012, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the first-ever combined operating license that authorized the construction and operation of two new reactors: Vogtle 3 & 4 in Georgia, the first nuclear reactor project to commence construction in more than 30 years in the United States. But less than six months later, cost overruns are approaching one billion dollars while a dispute between the project’s developers and a consortium of contractors over these cost increases and associated schedule changes threatens to delay the project’s expected completion date. Read More

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EIA’s Analysis of Bingaman Clean Energy Standard Underestimates Role of Renewable Energy

On May 2, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a new analysis of The Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012, proposed by Sen. Bingaman (D-NM), which greatly underestimates the potential contribution of renewable energy while making overly optimistic projections for nuclear power. The so-called “clean” energy standard (CES) would require electric utilities to gradually increase their power supply from low- and no-carbon sources from 24 percent in 2015 to 84 percent in 2035. More details on the bill, along with several improvements, are discussed in a separate UCS blog. Read More

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