Obama administration


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Photo: Karen Perry Stillerman

Food and Farm Progress to be Thankful For

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

It seems like a million years since October 2008. That’s when author Michael Pollan published his open letter to the next “farmer-in-chief,” calling on the incoming president to take bold steps to transform the nation’s food system. The role of farmer-in-chief has been inhabited ever since by Barack Obama, and as his presidency winds down, some observers—including Pollan—have criticized the administration for not doing enough.

Others have tempered that assessment, arguing that the Obamas accomplished a lot in the food arena under tough circumstances, even though we have a long way to go. Personally, I agree with the latter view: we have quite a bit to be thankful for, in terms of concrete progress over the last eight years toward a healthier, fairer, more vibrant food system. Read more >

Photo: Karen Perry Stillerman
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Why We Need an Executive Order on Political Spending: An Open Letter to President Obama

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Dear President Obama,

You’ve had a great week. With the Affordable Care Act upheld and nationwide marriage equality now the law, you must feel like celebrating. But wait!  Why not carry this momentum and take another step that would increase the equality and well-being of Americans?  I’m talking about an executive order asking government contractors to disclose their political spending. Read more >

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We Need a Clear Signal that the Obama Administration Will Issue Power Plant Carbon Standards Soon

, , lead economist and climate policy manager

More than a year after the EPA issued its draft carbon standards for new power plants, and subsequently received over 3.2 million comments in support of them, it has yet to finalize the standards. Meanwhile last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report saying the U.S. experienced $110 billion in damages from extreme weather in 2012, with Sandy ($65 billion) and the drought ($30 billion) being the two most costly events. We need President Obama to show that his administration is committed to continued, ambitious action to cut carbon emissions, delivering on his Inaugural Address promise. Read more >

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