occupational safety


Finally, a Silica Rule: A Story of Industry Interference and Regulatory Delay

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

“The science is clear,” Representative Frederica Wilson asserted in a Congressional hearing on silica earlier today. Last month, the Department of Labor issued the long-awaited silica rule to protect workers from health effects of crystalline silica dust exposure. Read more >

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White House, Finally, Releases Silica Rule

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

And now, for some good news. After more than two years of unnecessary delay, the White House Office of Management and Budget has finally allowed the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) to move forward with a proposed rule to protect workers from exposure to silica dust. I hope this is a sign that the White House will allow federal agencies to develop science-based public protections that advance their public health missions. That said, the development of the silica rule has been a fiasco, and much of the blame for delay lies with the White House.

I have written about this several times, but to recap:

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As White House Dawdles, More Workers Get Sick from Silica Exposure

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

Nearly two years after receiving a science-based proposal from the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) to protect workers from exposure to toxic crystalline silica dust, the White House Office of Management and Budget refuses to allow the agency to even seek feedback on its proposal. Public health advocates have put together a petition on the White House website urging the White House to act. The petition is worthy of your signature. Read more >

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300+ Experts Urge President Obama to Intervene to Protect Workers from Toxic Dust

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

Last Valentine’s Day, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration sent a proposed science-based rule to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review that would protect workers from silica. Regrettably, many months later, the OMB has not acted on the proposal, preventing OSHA from even seeking public input—and public health advocates are getting impatient. Read more >

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