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Posts Tagged ‘Power plant carbon standards’

How One State Cut its Carbon and Created Jobs

Last week I started as the new President of UCS, and this week I’m starting as our newest blogger. I couldn’t be more excited. I spent the last seven years as a public official in Massachusetts, including the last three as the commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. So it is only natural that my “inaugural” blog will focus on my experience in Massachusetts and, in particular, my state’s remarkable success in cutting carbon and growing a clean energy economy at the same time. Our track record in Massachusetts holds important lessons for the nation. Read More

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How the EPA Can Set a Strong, Flexible Power Plant Carbon Standard

A draft of the EPA’s carbon standards for existing power plants is due on June 1, 2014. There’s been a general call for flexibility in the design of these standards, which the EPA has committed to. Great River Energy Cooperative, Minnesota’s second-largest electric power supplier, recently proposed a regional carbon cap accompanied by a fee as one possible way to meet the upcoming standards. It’s a positive step, showing leadership and highlighting the importance of diverse regional approaches for getting significant, cost-effective reductions in carbon emissions. Read More

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The EPA Carbon Standards for New Power Plants: How They’ll Work and What’s Next

On September 20, the EPA released re-proposed draft power plant carbon standards for new power plants. These standards can serve as a backstop against future emissions. Together with standards for existing power plants, due next June, this is an opportunity to curtail global warming emissions from the largest single source of these emissions in the U.S. They are also a step forward in delivering on the President’s Climate Action Plan. Read More

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Power Plant Carbon Standards: The EPA Should Use the Clean Air Act’s Flexibility to Help Reduce Emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be reissuing a draft carbon standard for new power plants on or around September 20. These standards, particularly the one for existing power plants which will be issued in draft form in June 2014, could help reduce carbon emissions significantly if EPA uses existing flexibilities in the Clean Air Act to help ensure a transition away from polluting coal plants to clean sources like renewable energy and energy efficiency. Read More

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A Peek Inside the Administrator’s Inbox – Some of What’s Waiting for Gina McCarthy as New EPA Administrator

The Senate has finally confirmed Gina McCarthy, President Obama’s choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She starts with a very full plate. I have some personal experience with what lies ahead for Administrator McCarthy; I once directed a federal agency myself.

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Obama Directs the EPA to “Work Expeditiously” to Complete Standards for New and Existing Power Plants: Now the Details on How the EPA Can Deliver the Goods

Today President Obama will make a major speech outlining his administration’s plans to cut carbon emissions through agency actions. The centerpiece of the speech is expected to be an announcement that the President will direct the EPA to move ahead in setting carbon standards for both new and existing power plants. Today and in the weeks to come we’ll be following closely to hear the details on both timing and substance for these standards. Read More

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We Need a Clear Signal that the Obama Administration Will Issue Power Plant Carbon Standards Soon

More than a year after the EPA issued its draft carbon standards for new power plants, and subsequently received over 3.2 million comments in support of them, it has yet to finalize the standards. Meanwhile last week the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released a report saying the U.S. experienced $110 billion in damages from extreme weather in 2012, with Sandy ($65 billion) and the drought ($30 billion) being the two most costly events. We need President Obama to show that his administration is committed to continued, ambitious action to cut carbon emissions, delivering on his Inaugural Address promise. Read More

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Costly Climate Impacts Show Why We Need Power Plant Carbon Standards

Tomorrow the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will likely miss a legal deadline for finalizing its draft carbon standard for curtailing carbon emissions from new power plants. Power plants are the single largest stationary source of  U.S. global warming emissions. Cutting those emissions is critical to slowing the magnitude and pace of climate change. Furthermore, an ambitious standard is achievable because we have abundant cleaner forms of energy. So why the delay? Read More

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Well-Designed Power Plant Carbon Standards Can Reduce Emissions and Increase Renewable Energy

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to soon finalize carbon standards for new power plants, bolstering the existing market trend away from building new coal-fired power plants. Next up is the carbon standard for existing power plants – a major source of U.S. global warming emissions. Designing this standard with the flexibility to include renewable energy and efficiency as compliance options can help achieve deep emissions reductions at an affordable cost. Read More

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A Mother’s Day Seal of Approval for EPA’s Carbon Pollution Standard

With Mother’s Day coming up this weekend, I’ve been thinking a lot about all that my Mom did to give me a great start in life and how I’d like to do the same for my kids. I’d certainly like them, and all kids everywhere, to grow up in a world that’s healthy and safe. But climate change poses a real threat to our kids’ futures and it’s up to us Moms (and Dads and aunts and uncles and responsible adults) to do something about that. Read More

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