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Posts Tagged ‘public health’

Is Small Farmers’ Firewood Use Burning up the Forests?

For many years, small farmers in developing countries have been blamed for deforestation because of the way that they make breakfast. While in developed countries nearly everyone cooks with fossil fuels, or with electricity generated by fossil fuels or hydroelectricity, in developing countries firewood still predominates, especially among the poorest people in rural areas. But is this really an important driver of deforestation—and thus a major contributor to global warming? A new study—the most in-depth and comprehensive look at the subject yet—says no.

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Introducing Food Access: A Tale of Two Grocery Shopping Trips

Sunday is grocery shopping day.

As I sit on the couch sipping my morning coffee, my husband walks over and asks, “What do you want to make for dinner this week?” I reach for a pen on our coffee table and a piece of paper. Before we head out to the store, we make a list of what we’re cooking for dinner each night of the week. Read More

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Beware of This Zombie Bill: The Regulatory Accountability Act Returns from the Dead

The House leadership has promised a new day for Congress. Less partisanship, more governing. But it’s hard to believe them when first out of the gate the House chooses to recycle one of its most divisive bills, and one which would greatly harm science-informed policymaking at federal agencies.

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Governor Cuomo is Not a Scientist—So He Asked the Experts

In late October, I wrote about the disturbing trend of politicians copping out of taking public policy positions by saying, “I am not a scientist.” Well, yesterday we heard Governor Andrew Cuomo complete the sentence in a way that I applaud. He said, “…I’m not a scientist.  So let’s bring the emotion down, and let’s ask the qualified experts what their opinion is.” Read More

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Preventing Asthma: Searching “Upstream” for the Evidence

Guest Bogger

Felix Aguilar, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

Los Angeles, CA

The buzzing sound of a hand-held nebulizer has become background noise at my clinic. It sounds like a hive of bees moving noisily. Everyday children and adults in South Los Angeles get asthma treatments at community clinics because of exacerbations, also known as asthma attacks. I am a family physician with over a decade of work at community clinics in the poorest areas of Los Angeles. Read More

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A Science-Based Ozone Standard At Last? The Obama Administration Releases Long-Awaited Draft Rules

The regulation of ozone pollution has had a complicated history in recent years, but today marks a potential turning point toward an ozone standard that protects public health. Read More

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Added Sugar? You’re Killing Me

Earlier this year the Center for Science and Democracy released two reports on added sugar in processed foods and beverages (not naturally occurring in the primary contents) and its impact on public health. In our first report, we showed how advertising practices, particularly to children, have manipulated the food “choices” people make and have contributed to an epidemic of obesity and diet related disease in the United States and around the world. In our second report, we documented the role the food industry has played in obscuring the facts about sugar in our diet by manipulating or hiding scientific evidence and information for public. Read More

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We All Have Something to Contribute: Environmental Justice and the Importance of Place

Guest Bogger

Adelita G. Cantu, PhD, RN
Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

San Antonio, Texas

I have been a public health nurse for over 35 years! When I say it like that, sometimes I feel and know that I am getting old, very old. But it also makes me realize that I have accumulated a vast amount of experience and expertise, particularly when it comes to the community’s perspective on their health and environment and their resulting needs towards achieving a healthy community. Read More

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Community-Driven Study Finds Unsafe Air Pollution Levels near Oil and Gas Facilities

Ever think that your rural backyard could face air pollution levels in excess of 100 times EPA health standards?  Jeff and Rhonda Locker of Wyoming didn’t think so either. But a new peer-reviewed study out in Environmental Health today suggests that such spikes in air pollution in your backyard are possible if you live next to an oil and gas facility. Read More

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Going Beyond Investigative Bench Science to Support Community Nutrition

Guest Bogger

Megan Meyer, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC

In 2013, nearly 15% of US households, or in 17.5 million Americans, were food-insecure. According to the USDA, food-insecure households are defined as those that “have difficulty providing enough food for all family members due to lack of resources.” With this large domestic problem, many communities have developed programs to alleviate food insecurity. Read More

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