regulatory accountability act


One of Many Risks of the Regulatory Accountability Act: Flawed Risk Assessment Guidelines

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Tomorrow, the Senate will begin marking up Senator Rob Portman’s version of the Regulatory Accountability Act (RAA), which my colleague Yogin wrote a primer about last week. This bill is an attempt to impose excessive burdens on every federal agency to freeze the regulatory process or otherwise tie up important science-based rules in years of judicial review. Read more >

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5 Reasons Why the Regulatory Accountability Act is Bad for Science

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

Last week, Senator Rob Portman introduced his version of the Regulatory Accountability Act (RAA), a bill that would significantly disrupt our science-based rulemaking process. A version of this inherently flawed, impractical proposal has been floating around Washington for nearly seven years now, and the latest, S. 951, is just as troubling as previous iterations. Read more >

Photo: James Gathany, CDC
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The Regulatory Accountability Act Subverts Science and Must Be Stopped

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Today, just four days after hundreds of thousands of people marched for science, the Senate introduced a bill that would substitute politics for scientific judgment in every decision the government makes about public health and the environment. If enacted, the legislation would cripple the government’s ability to effectively carry out laws that protect us, putting everyone at more risk, especially communities of color and low-income communities that are more exposed to threats. Read more >

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Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury, “Galileo before the Holy Office” (1847)
Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury, “Galileo before the Holy Office” (1847)

The Inquisition Congress, Abetted by Trump, Has Begun

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

The increasingly reckless House of Representatives, caught up in a public mutiny, may have walked back its abandonment of congressional ethics. But it simultaneously took several other steps that will enable corruption and greatly expand political influence over the work of experts at NASA, NOAA, EPA, and other science agencies, compromising their ability to serve the public interest. Read more >

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