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Posts Tagged ‘Renewable energy’

Making Room for Renewables: Grid Integration Solutions for California’s Clean Energy Future

I’ve blogged many times about the clean energy policies California has in place that have made it a leader. The state is well on its way to supplying 33 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and now, in a visionary step to dramatically reduce global warming emissions, is considering ways to increase that amount to 50 percent by 2030. Read More

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Risking Our Clean Energy Future by Gambling with an Overreliance on Natural Gas

Many U.S. electric utilities are doubling down on natural gas to generate power as they retire aging and polluting coal plants. While this unprecedented shift does provides some near-term benefits, dramatically expanding our use of natural gas to generate electricity is an ill-advised gamble that poses complex economic, public health, and climate risks. Read More

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Pennsylvania Governor Proposes Big Investments in Renewable Energy and Efficiency

Today, in his first budget address as Governor of Pennsylvania, Tom Wolf proposed $325 million in investments in the state’s energy sector, including significant investments in wind, solar, and energy efficiency. This proposal is part of an overall economic development plan aimed at investing in education and creating high-paying jobs across the Commonwealth. What does it mean? Read More

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Is Small Farmers’ Firewood Use Burning up the Forests?

For many years, small farmers in developing countries have been blamed for deforestation because of the way that they make breakfast. While in developed countries nearly everyone cooks with fossil fuels, or with electricity generated by fossil fuels or hydroelectricity, in developing countries firewood still predominates, especially among the poorest people in rural areas. But is this really an important driver of deforestation—and thus a major contributor to global warming? A new study—the most in-depth and comprehensive look at the subject yet—says no.

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5 Reasons Why Colorado Should Increase—Not Roll Back—Its Renewable Energy Standard

UPDATE: (March 3, 11 a.m.): Good news! Yesterday, the Colorado House of Representative’s State, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee voted against the proposed rollback of the state’s renewable energy standard, effectively killing SB 44 for the 2015 legislative session. This is yet another defeat for fossil fuel interests who do not want to compete with renewables on a more level playing field.

On February 5th, state Senate Republicans passed a bill to roll back Colorado’s renewable energy standard (RES), which has helped make the state a national leader in clean energy. Rolling back the RES is precisely the wrong direction for Colorado to go at this time. In addition to providing important benefits to Colorado’s economy, increasing renewable energy use is one of the most cost-effective strategies for complying with the EPA’s proposed power plant carbon standards. Read More

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What Snow and the U.S. Army Tell Us About Coal vs. Renewable Energy

Winter has a way of showing what engineers describe as margins for error, and contingencies or unexpected events. When the snow on the road makes your car slide before coming to a stop, you lower your driving speed and increase the distance between you and the car in front of you. Read More

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Where Florida’s Electricity Comes From, and How It Can Do Better

Florida has been on my mind lately, as storm after storm has piled the snow up outside my door and relatives have called from the Sunshine State to report on the (rather higher) temperatures they’re experiencing. But the state has also been attracting attention with its electric sector moves—some positive, some less so.

When it comes to electricity, the Sunshine State is still far short of living up to its clean energy potential. Here’s how and why decision makers should fix that. Read More

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Minnesota Scientists, Engineers, Economists, and Health Professionals Support Clean Energy

Guest Bogger

Dr. Lee Frelich
Director, Center for Forest Ecology, University of Minnesota

St. Paul, MN

Minnesota has an important opportunity this year to continue its leadership on clean energy.  I, along with 54 other Minnesota scientists, engineers, economists, and health professionals, support requiring 40 percent of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, by the year 2030. Read More

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President Obama, India’s Prime Minister Modi, and the Opportunity to Cooperate on Climate Change

When I was growing up in New Delhi, the annual Republic Day celebrations were always cause for great national pride. They commemorate the day this large, vibrant democracy’s constitution came into force, after India secured its independence from British colonial rule. This year President Obama will be a special guest for the Republic Day parade, a spectacular display of India’s rich cultural heritage and military might. What I am keenly interested to hear are the ways in which Prime Minister Modi and President Obama plan to cooperate to address one of the biggest challenges facing the world today: climate change. Read More

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As Michigan Governor Looks Beyond Coal, Now Is the Time to Ramp Up Renewable Energy

Big changes to Michigan’s energy policy could be on the table in 2015. Governor Snyder gave a short peek into his energy agenda Tuesday night in his State of the State address where he stressed the need to transition away from coal as a main energy source in Michigan and announced plans to create a new Energy Agency. Read More

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