science and democracy


Community Connections: Scientist-Citizens Have a Critical Role to Play

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Many community organizations struggle to be heard in our noisy democracy. Even on critical issues such as air and water quality, health hazards from chemicals, local food policy, environmental justice for disadvantaged communities, and the rising challenges of global warming, their voices and needs are often drowned out by those who argue that addressing public health, safety and the environment is too expensive. That those concerns get in the way of economic growth. And too often, the views of community organizations are dismissed because their arguments are not framed in technical terms. Read more >

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Baltimore against the Measles: A Victory for Science, but for How Long?

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

When I was an undergraduate at Johns Hopkins University, I had only a dim awareness of the measles outbreak then raging through Baltimore. I was fully vaccinated, spent most of my time on campus, and lived in university housing among mostly white, middle and upper-middle class students, who were also fully vaccinated. Measles, for me, was a remote thing, despite its proximity. It didn’t happen to anyone I knew. Read more >

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A Science-Informed Post-Sandy Resilience Plan, but Hoboken Faces Challenges Implementing It

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

Last August, Dawn Zimmer, mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey, formally released the Hoboken Resiliency and Readiness Plan to address ongoing Hurricane Sandy rebuilding efforts. The plan marked an important milestone for the “Mile Square City” by establishing a strong set of science-informed policy objectives that would help protect citizens from future climate change impacts. Read more >

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Through the Looking Glass: Climate Change Denial, Conflict of Interest and Connecting Science to Policy

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

The Boston Globe has an outstanding series of articles entitled “Broken City” and it is not hard to guess which city they are referring to.  Hint—not the one that boasts a World-Series-winning team. Read more >

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5 Ways the Shutdown Will Continue to Be a Drag for Early Career Scientists

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

All the world is not a stage. The recent theatrics in Congress over raising the debt ceiling and reopening the government have made some people laugh, others cry, and still others simply deny the seriousness of the issues. With the immediate fiscal crisis now behind us and the government again open for business, some people may believe that our troubles, at least for the moment, are behind us, too. But for early career scientists—graduate students, postdocs, and even talented undergraduates—the shutdown has had very real, concrete consequences. Read more >

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