science-based decision making


An Insider’s View on the Value of Federal Research

Mike Haas, , UCS

Not long after receiving my doctorate in biochemistry I took a research position with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the main research arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Prior to retiring in 2014 I had spent my entire career, 33 years, with ARS. I had a chance to see federal research from within the system. Contrary to what you may have heard, it’s been my experience that federal research is solutions-oriented, transparent, and nonpolitical.   Read more >

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Americans Deserve Better than the Heartland Institute’s Climate “Experts”

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Who did President Trump invite to his Paris Climate Agreement announcement? A cadre of industry-tied lobbyists and others who have peddled climate disinformation for years. Read more >

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On EPA Scientific Integrity, Wall Street Journal is Short of Facts

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

An opinion piece in today’s Wall Street Journal misrepresents the facts about an annual meeting on scientific integrity at the EPA and the role of the EPA scientific integrity officer. Here are some details about what that meeting is and the role of federal agency scientific integrity officers.  Read more >

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No Rest for the Sea-weary: Science in the Service of Continually Improving Ocean Management

Marissa Baskett, , UCS

Marine reserves, or no-fishing zones, are increasing throughout the world. Their goals are variable and numerous, often a mix of conserving our ocean’s biodiversity and supporting the ability to fish for seafood outside reserves for generations to come. California is one location that has seen the recent implementation of marine reserves, where the California Marine Life Protection Act led to the establishment of one of the world’s largest networks of marine reserves. Read more >

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Shake, Rattle, and Rainout: Federal Support for Disaster Research

Joyce Levine, PhD, AICP, , UCS

Hurricanes, wildfires, and earthquakes are simply natural events—until humans get in their way. The resulting disasters are particularly devastating in urban areas, due to high concentrations of people and property. Losses from disasters have risen steadily over the past five decades, thanks to increased populations and urban development in high-hazard areas, particularly the coasts. There is also significant evidence that climate change is making weather-related events more frequent and more severe as well. As a result, it is more critical than ever that natural hazards research is being incorporated into emergency planning decisions. Read more >

Graphic: NOAA
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