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Posts Tagged ‘Scientific Integrity’

Tell Pfizer’s Board to Break with Heartland

Misinformation about climate science is a dangerous thing. Scientists have been telling policymakers for years that climate change poses serious threats to our health and economic well-being. But too many polluting corporations have pursued a strategy of delay and denial to protect their near-term bottom lines rather than the public interest. Read More

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The Future Health of Scientific Integrity is at Stake in New FDA Law

The news these days has rightly focused on the Supreme Court’s landmark decision on access to health care.  But with scant media attention, Congress on June 26 sent a bill to the President that is just as important  to the health and well-being of each and every American family, and the future of scientific integrity at the Food and Drug Administration. Read More

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Science, a Cartoon Contest, and a Top Ten List

With the summer months come many things: the Washington Nationals (currently in first place!), longer days, sangria, and the opportunity to laugh out loud at my desk as I look at entries in our  annual editorial cartoon contest. Read More

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BP Goes After Scientists Who Helped Them During the Gulf Oil Disaster

The attack on the privacy of scientists’ email communication is expanding. It’s not just those who deny climate change who are going after the emails. Two scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution wrote in the Boston Globe over the weekend that British Petroleum has successfully subpoenaed more than 3,000 confidential emails among scientists that discuss the Gulf oil disaster. Read More

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Senate Does the Right Thing for Whistleblowers – So Close to a Win-Win-Win

At last, a bit of good news and a glimmer of hope from Congress. Last Tuesday evening (May 8), the Senate unanimously approved S. 743, the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act. Read More

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New Executive Order Could Limit Ability of U.S. Science Agencies to Protect the Public

It is ironic that 50 years after the drug thalidomide was found to have caused serious harm to tens of thousands of babies in Europe and Great Britain, but not the U.S., both the Administration and Congress are backing efforts that could unravel the safety net and erode the power of American agencies to protect public health and safety. Read More

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How Conflicted Experts Can Sway FDA Drug Approval Decisions: A Case Study on Yaz

Experts on FDA advisory panels with financial conflicts of interest can influence the approval of a drug in multiple ways, not only by voting to approve a drug but also by dominating the discussion and pressuring other panelists. In the case of the popular contraceptive drug Yaz, four scientists with financial conflicts of interest were enough to push the vote in favor of the drug, with significant consequences for some women. Read More

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GM Drives Away From Climate Denial, Dumps Heartland Institute

The big news today is that General Motors said they’ll no longer fund a group that regularly attacks climate science.

According to the Huffington Post, “The automaker told the Heartland Institute last week that it won’t be making further donations, spokesman Greg Martin said.” Read More

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Money Talks, and What It’s Saying May Harm the FDA

Any way you look at it, $700 million is a lot of cash. That’s the amount that industries regulated by the FDA have spent since 2009 lobbying Congress and the Executive Branch. That investment is paying off as Congress now considers must-pass legislation that governs how the FDA uses science to evaluate prescription drugs and medical devices. Read More

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Where the FDA Turns When It Needs Scientific Advice

While there’s a wealth of scientific expertise inside the FDA and other federal scientific agencies, FDA’s scientific staff often rely on the advice of experts outside the agency to help them decide whether to approve a new prescription drug or medical device, or to recall a product or issue stronger warning labels when there are safety problems. Read More

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