silica


Photo: Kai Schreiber./CC BY-SA (Flickr)

The Budget Process Shouldn’t Be a Playground for Special Interests

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

It’s appropriations season in Congress. And that means special interests. Read more >

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Finally, a Silica Rule: A Story of Industry Interference and Regulatory Delay

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

“The science is clear,” Representative Frederica Wilson asserted in a Congressional hearing on silica earlier today. Last month, the Department of Labor issued the long-awaited silica rule to protect workers from health effects of crystalline silica dust exposure. Read more >

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Waiting Game on the Budget: Will the Cockroaches Prevail?

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

As I am writing this blog, it is Friday afternoon, December 11. Congress should have passed the spending bills for government operations for the 2016 fiscal year by October 1. Instead, faced with the prospect of a government shutdown, lawmakers approved a short-term bill to fund the government until December 11. Today is the deadline for that funding bill. And yet we are still playing the waiting game. Read more >

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New Report Illuminates the American Chemistry Council’s Efforts to Undermine the Chemical Policies that Protect Us

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

I always assumed that if chemicals were in use, they were safe. As a child, I’d play in the grass despite pesticide warning signs and never thought about my water bottle’s material. If there was evidence that the chemicals were harmful, we wouldn’t be allowed to use them, right? This is, of course, how it should work. But the reality is that special interests can get in the way of public health protections when it comes to our chemical policies. My new report shows just how harmful that influence can be. Read more >

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Bad Policies Should Not Get a Free “Ride” on Spending Bills

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

I try hard not to be cynical about Congress. I believe that in the House and Senate, many men and women of good will and their staffs work hard to advance policies that they believe will benefit the people they represent. Our elected representatives may disagree about what the best solutions are. But they are motivated by the desire to do good, not ill.

That sentiment is being tested as the House and Senate vote on a series of spending bills to pay for government agencies and other expenses in the coming fiscal year. Read more >

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