solar energy


Smiles in the sunshine. Credit: Solar Energy Industries Association

One Million Solar Energy Systems Now Turned On in US

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Around the country, solar advocates are cheering. One million solar installations (including nearly 950,000 rooftops) are now turned on somewhere in the US, a symbolic milestone signaling a fundamental change in the energy landscape. Read more >

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Cautious Hope: Global CO2 Emissions Remain Flat in 2015 while Renewable Energy Surges

, lead economist and climate policy manager

New data released today show that, for the second year in a row, global carbon dioxide emissions remained flat in 2015. Coming off the Paris Agreement, these trends are cause for hope that we are making progress toward addressing climate change. Read more >

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5 Things Governor Baker Got Right About Energy in Massachusetts (and 1 Thing He Missed)

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

Governor Charlie Baker gave his first annual State of the Commonwealth address last night, and energy was the first item on his to-do list: solar, wind, hydro, and more. Here are five snippets that highlight things he got (mostly) right, and one other issue he needs to re-think. Read more >

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How to Go Solar: The Quotes Are In. Now What?

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

I’m at a key stage in my journey to solar-hood: I’ve got quotes in hand from multiple solar companies, and just needed to sort through ‘em. Here are a few surprising things about the bids, and what they mean for next steps. Read more >

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Back to the Future? Clean Energy, Clean Cars, and 7 Ways We’ve Leapt Forward from 1985 to 2015

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

At the end of the classic 1985 movie “Back to the Future”, our young heroes travel in a flying DeLorean to a distant time: October 21, 2015, to be precise. What Marty McFly and Jennifer Parker find is a world that is familiar in a lot of ways, but advanced in others.

In our own version of 2015, we’re distinctly deficient in self-tying shoes, self-drying clothes, and hoverboards (maybe). And (maybe more importantly) there’s a decided dearth of garbage-fed flux capacitors for flying cars. It turns out we still power a few too many of our cars and homes with fossil fuels (that’s so 20th century…). But when it comes to some other aspects of energy and transportation, here are seven examples of how we’ve come a long way. Read more >

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