sustainable agriculture


Happy Cow Creamery, a pasture-based dairy and creamery located in South Carolina, produces dairy products processed on farm and sold into regional markets and through an on farm market. Photo: Climate Listening Project

Climate Change, Resilience, and the Future of Food

Laura Lengnick, , UCS

The United States food system has proven remarkably adaptable over the last 150 years, producing an abundant supply of food, feed, and fiber crops for national and international markets amidst dynamic social change, and despite dramatic natural resource variability across North America. Read more >

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What Can “Local” Food Do?

David Arthur Cleveland, , UCS

What does “local food” mean? Most of us think of local food as something that was grown nearby geographically, although the distances can vary a lot.

We also tend to make a lot of assumptions about what local food can do. For example, we think of “local” food, as a more sustainable alternative to the global, industrial food system that produces lots of food, but is also environmentally destructive, makes people sick, and leaves many hungry. Read more >

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California Floods Remind Us To Make Agricultural Water Conservation a Top Priority

, Kendall Science Fellow

Yes, you’ve been reading the headlines correctly the last few weeks. There’s been so much rain in drought-stricken California that excess water has led to flooded homes, damaged roads, dangerous mudslides and tragically, several fatalities. To make matters worse, the abundant rainfall hasn’t even cured the state’s current woes. Read more >

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Photo: USDA-NRCS

On World Soils Day, Five Fun Facts About the Underdog of Natural Resources

, Kendall Science Fellow

Happy World Soils Day! We seem to hear a lot about the importance of clean water and clean air, but soils less frequently get the attention they deserve. Read more >

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The Second Worst Flooding in Iowa History That You Probably Didn’t Read About

, Kendall Science Fellow

“No news is good news” was a take-home message from heavy rains that soaked Northern Iowa in late September, raising river levels to their second highest mark ever. Thanks to proactive work of emergency responders, community leaders, flood scientists and eager volunteers, there were not damages on the scale of other recent deadly floods in Louisiana and North Carolina.

However, the increasing intensity and frequency of heavy rainfall means that the damages escaped this time around should not lead to complacency. Rather, even more proactive planning will be required, particularly in agricultural areas, in order to prevent future floods from making headlines. Read more >

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