#tippingpoints


Aerial view of crop sprinklers near Rio Vista, California in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region. Photo: California Department of Water Resources

California’s Water Well Bill Will Tell Us Who’s Tapping Depleted Groundwater Basins

, climate scientist

Groundwater is a shared resource between communities and landowners, much like a joint bank account is a shared resource between individuals. Except in one key way: groundwater users often don’t know who they are sharing water with or how much others are saving or spending. This might not be a problem when there is plenty of water, but such loose accounting can become very problematic when water is scarce. A new Senate Bill will help us keep track of water wells in overdrafted basins. Read more >

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Survey Shows Abundant Snow, But Will it Stick?

, climate scientist

Today’s snow survey confirms abundant snow in the Sierra Nevada. But, early snowmelt will cause flooding and require reservoirs to spill excess water that could threaten safety of California dams in the weeks to come. It’s time to stop looking up to the mountains for our water supply and start paying attention to our aquifers. Read more >

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Learning from Oroville Dam Disaster: State Water Board Proposes Climate Change Resolution

, climate scientist

Earlier this week, while areas downstream of Oroville Dam were still under an evacuation order, California’s State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) released a draft resolution for a comprehensive response to climate change. Read more >

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Measuring California's snowpack. Photo: California Department of Water Resources

California Snow Levels Below Normal Despite Heavy Rains

, climate scientist

Today the California Department of Water Resources conducted its snow survey, which found below normal snow levels for this time of year. Read more >

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Climate Change is Shaping California’s Water Future: Watch Our New Webinar

, climate scientist

In the water world, October marks the beginning of a new “water year,” which means that the 2016 drought year is officially over and speculation is already beginning over whether the coming year will be wet or dry. Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted a “weak” La Niña or dry weather pattern starting in late fall or early winter. Read more >

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