#tippingpoints


Learning from Oroville Dam Disaster: State Water Board Proposes Climate Change Resolution

, climate scientist

Earlier this week, while areas downstream of Oroville Dam were still under an evacuation order, California’s State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) released a draft resolution for a comprehensive response to climate change. Read more >

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Measuring California's snowpack. Photo: California Department of Water Resources

California Snow Levels Below Normal Despite Heavy Rains

, climate scientist

Today the California Department of Water Resources conducted its snow survey, which found below normal snow levels for this time of year. Read more >

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Climate Change is Shaping California’s Water Future: Watch Our New Webinar

, climate scientist

In the water world, October marks the beginning of a new “water year,” which means that the 2016 drought year is officially over and speculation is already beginning over whether the coming year will be wet or dry. Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted a “weak” La Niña or dry weather pattern starting in late fall or early winter. Read more >

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Building on Success: Governor Signs UCS-Sponsored Water-Energy Bill

, climate scientist

Over the weekend, California Governor Brown signed a bill authored by Senator Fran Pavley and sponsored by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), creating a voluntary Water-Energy Nexus Registry. The Climate Registry provides this guest blog, explaining how the bill builds on The Climate Registry’s efforts to develop consistent benchmarks to track the relationship among water, energy, and greenhouse gases. This type of information is needed for the water sector to become part of the climate solution, according to a recent UCS report: Clean Energy Opportunities in California’s Water Sector. Read more >

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Come El Niño or La Niña, Climate Change is La Madre of Weather Systems

, climate scientist

It’s getting close to that time of year when weather watchers and water managers start wringing their hands and wondering whether it will be a boy or a girl. The boy is none other than El Niño – that Pacific weather pattern characterized by warm ocean temperatures and heavy precipitation. Last year, we heard all about the monster El Niño that would refill California’s reservoirs. But it never actually materialized. Now, the National Weather Service projects a different winter visitor – La Niña. She’s the opposite of her brother – a weather pattern characterized by dry conditions. Get ready for the headlines: Miserly La Niña steals our water! Read more >

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