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Posts Tagged ‘Tropical deforestation’

“Sustainable” Palm Oil Should Not Drive Deforestation

We all know that “sustainable” is a good thing but the word is only as strong as its definition. Right now, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) has a huge opportunity to strengthen its definition by adding critical forest and climate protections to its standards. The world is watching and waiting to see if “sustainable” palm oil will be a truly sustainable solution for the future. Read More

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Another Large Drop in Deforestation in Brazil

Over the past several years, one of the few pieces of hopeful news about global warming has been the annual release of data from Brazil on its rate of Amazon deforestation. Since forests are immense storehouses of carbon, deforestation causes high levels of greenhouse gas emission. Brazil, which contains about 60% of the Amazon forest, is key to those emissions, and over the last six years it has made important progress in reducing its deforestation rate.

Today, the new data for 2011-2012 were released, and once again they are a ray of sunshine on an otherwise gloomy day. They show a decrease of deforestation to 4,656 square kilometersdown 27% from last year.
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Rethinking Forest Plantations

Last winter, after two weeks at the climate negotiations in Durban, I took a few days of vacation and visited the unique “Afrotemperate forests” of the Southern Cape of South Africa, in the Knysna-Tsitsikamma region. Natural forests cover less that 0.5 percent of South Africa, which is much more famous for wildlife-rich savannas and for the incredibly biodiverse fynbos vegetation around the Cape of Good Hope. Read More

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Everybody’s Business: Consumer Goods Companies and Tropical Deforestation

Over the past five years, I’ve noticed that our work here at UCS on tropical deforestation has gradually changed its emphasis from actions in tropical forest countries, such as REDD+, to what can be done in consuming countries (which are not the same as developed countries) about the demand that drives tropical deforestation. Read More

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What Wood You Do: Solutions for Deforestation-Free Wood Products

I’m writing this post from the back porch of my parent’s house (even on vacation there is no rest for a Concerned Scientist). Away from the glass, steel, concrete, and brick of Washington, DC, here I realize I am immersed in a world of wood. Read More

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Beef, Tropical Forests, Our Climate, and Our Health

In preparing our new UCS report on meat and deforestation, I’ve been surprised at how often people think you’re saying “meat” when you actually said “beef.” Beef is meat, of course, but it’s not the only kind, and in fact it’s not even the most popular kind. Worldwide, pork actually has the largest share of meat consumption (40 percent) with poultry second at 34 percent. Beef makes up only 24 percent, and is continuing to decline in relative terms. Read More

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The Lacey Act: Protecting the Protector

Question: Which U.S. law that protects endangered species, tropical forests, and U.S. jobs is now in need of  protection itself?

Answer: The Lacey Act.

For the last 100 years the Lacey Act has protected endangered species within the United States by making it illegal to transport them across state lines. In 2008, the act was amended to include a ban on the importation of illegally harvested timber from foreign countries. Now these amendments are under attack in Congress.

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Happy Arbor Day!

Today is National Arbor Day here in the US of A (dates differ in other countries), a day for people around the country to plant and care for trees and if you can’t do that it’s worth taking a moment to reflect on the importance of trees and forests.  While I make a living thinking about trees, I rarely get a chance to step back and reflect on what they have meant to me. Read More

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Five Good Reasons to Eat Food (and One Not-So-Good One)

For most of my life I never thought much about what I ate. Generally I’ve been dependent on others – first my mother, now my wife – for good meals. My foraging philosophy has been simple: When I feel hungry, I search for something close at hand and do whatever is necessary to make it edible. Like the Checkers ad says, “ya gotta eat,” so I do.

However, in the last few years I’ve started to think about what I eat, and why. Read More

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Two 16-year-old Girl Scouts Win First Ever UN Forest Heroes Award

An effort begun by two Girl Scouts at age 11 linked orangutans with Girl Scout Cookies. Read More

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