Trump Administration

Our experts and analysts weigh in on the latest developments in the Trump administration.


Michael Dourson: A Toxic Choice for Our Health and Safety

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

When it comes to conflicts of interest, few nominations can top that of Michael Dourson to lead the EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Conflicts of Interest? NOAA’s Nominees AccuWeather CEO Barry Myers, and Dr. Neil Jacobs of Panasonic

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

The slow process by the Trump administration of selecting and nominating candidates for high level government positions to lead federal agencies is continuing to creep along now nearly ten months into his presidency.   Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Scott Pruitt’s Cynical Move to Rescind the Clean Power Plan

, president

Tomorrow, the EPA is expected to take a first formal step in repealing the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan (CPP), a regulation designed to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by approximately 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. This is a terribly irresponsible decision. Recent ferocious storms, intensified by warming oceans and air, remind us of the urgent need to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan is a sensible, flexible, cost-effective rule addressing one of one of the biggest sources of US carbon emissions, and one of the least expensive sources to control. Read more >

Photo: justice.gov
Bookmark and Share

Photo: USCapitol/Flickr

What’s Tax “Reform” Got to Do with Science and Public Well-being?

, director of strategy & policy

What’s been largely overlooked are the negative impacts of this tax plan on the public science enterprise and the well-being of all Americans. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Photo: Chris Hunkeler/CC BY-SA (Flickr)

One Lesson For DOE From Harvey & Maria: Fossil Fuels Aren’t Always Reliable

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

The US Department of Energy has proposed that paying coal plants more will make the grid reliable. But last month, three feet of rain from Hurricane Harvey at a coal plant in Fort Bend, Texas complicated the messaging around the reliability of fossil fuels in extreme weather. The vulnerability of power grids to storm damage is also on horrible display in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Read more >

Photo: Chris Hunkeler/CC BY-SA (Flickr)
Bookmark and Share