wind power


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Big News: 39 States and Their Utilities Write Plan for Deep CO2 Reductions

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

A major collaboration between officials from 39 states and 26 major utility companies shows how the eastern U.S. could cut carbon 42% by 2030 and reach 30% renewable energy in the electricity supply. Read more >

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Wind Power Soars to New Heights, One Megawatt at a Time

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

The 2015 wind power results are just in, and the news is worth celebrating: strong performance over the course of the year, a great finish, and lots more to come. What struck me most about the impressive fourth quarter results alone—5,001 new megawatts—was that final digit, the 1. It’s a reminder that, when it comes to wind, each megawatt counts, and that it all adds up to real progress. Read more >

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That’s Not How Commerce Works—U.S. Chamber Wrong (Again) in New Clean Power Plan Report

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Some sales efforts work from a false starting point. Some try to lead the gullible consumer by pretending to share an insider’s secret with them. Some fall back on old slogans. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has employed all three of these tactics in its latest attack on the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. Read more >

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Flaws in a Mining Industry “Study” of the Clean Power Plan

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Another day, another false study of the costs and benefits of the EPA Clean Power Plan. Read more >

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Back to the Future? Clean Energy, Clean Cars, and 7 Ways We’ve Leapt Forward from 1985 to 2015

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

At the end of the classic 1985 movie “Back to the Future”, our young heroes travel in a flying DeLorean to a distant time: October 21, 2015, to be precise. What Marty McFly and Jennifer Parker find is a world that is familiar in a lot of ways, but advanced in others.

In our own version of 2015, we’re distinctly deficient in self-tying shoes, self-drying clothes, and hoverboards (maybe). And (maybe more importantly) there’s a decided dearth of garbage-fed flux capacitors for flying cars. It turns out we still power a few too many of our cars and homes with fossil fuels (that’s so 20th century…). But when it comes to some other aspects of energy and transportation, here are seven examples of how we’ve come a long way. Read more >

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