wind power


Flaws in a Mining Industry “Study” of the Clean Power Plan

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Another day, another false study of the costs and benefits of the EPA Clean Power Plan. Read more >

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Back to the Future? Clean Energy, Clean Cars, and 7 Ways We’ve Leapt Forward from 1985 to 2015

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

At the end of the classic 1985 movie “Back to the Future”, our young heroes travel in a flying DeLorean to a distant time: October 21, 2015, to be precise. What Marty McFly and Jennifer Parker find is a world that is familiar in a lot of ways, but advanced in others.

In our own version of 2015, we’re distinctly deficient in self-tying shoes, self-drying clothes, and hoverboards (maybe). And (maybe more importantly) there’s a decided dearth of garbage-fed flux capacitors for flying cars. It turns out we still power a few too many of our cars and homes with fossil fuels (that’s so 20th century…). But when it comes to some other aspects of energy and transportation, here are seven examples of how we’ve come a long way. Read more >

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Solar Power Shines in Land of Oil and Wind

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

The news today of a large solar plant in Texas tells a story about the future of energy in a place with a rich energy past. Read more >

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“A Big Deal… A Big Move”: the U.S. Wind Industry’s New Plan for Protecting Bats

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

On the eve of National Wildlife Day, the U.S. wind industry association has just announced an important new approach to protecting bats from direct impacts from wind turbines. Here’s the lowdown on who’s involved, what they’re doing, and why it matters. Read more >

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Cheap Renewable Energy is Here. Why Doesn’t The Grid Plan For It?

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Wind farms and solar arrays are setting new records for low energy prices, with wind under 2 ½ cents and solar under 4 cents when conditions are right. These are cheap prices, given electricity from new natural gas plants is in the 5-7 cents range, coal at 6-10 cents, and nuclear somewhere between 13 and 15 cents, according to one fleet owner (nuclear can be unpredictable). So why aren’t more electric grid operators incorporating this energy as they plan to meet grid needs? Read more >

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