wind power


The Pope Is an Energy Wonk. Engineers Agree with His Assessment.

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

From the Papal encyclical: “In some places, cooperatives are being developed to exploit renewable sources of energy which ensure local self-sufficiency and even the sale of surplus energy. This simple example shows that, while the existing world order proves powerless to assume its responsibilities, local individuals and groups can make a real difference.” Read more >

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Hey NERC, Where’s the Fire? Digging into a Flawed Study on the Clean Power Plan

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

We all know that yelling “fire” in a crowded theater is an abuse of free speech. Anyone doing that yelling will be called to account for their behavior. We should expect the same in the NERC portrayals of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. It’s time to see if there is evidence in their analyses that supports their alarms—and I don’t see how they justify the calls for delays. Read more >

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What Would We Do With Cheap Energy Storage Batteries?

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

What would we do if cheap energy storage became a reality? We would put an end to carbon emissions from fossil fuel. The debate would be over. The missing pieces of the puzzle would be in hand.

This is something to contemplate. Read more >

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Three Reasons Carbon Reduction Is Easy In The Central U.S.

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

The debate over reliability and the costs of reducing carbon pollution comes to St. Louis with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) holding a technical conference on the electricity grid with the EPA carbon pollution rules. Folks looking at this debate should consider three reasons why the central U.S. has great opportunities to reduce carbon pollution: Read more >

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What Snow and the U.S. Army Tell Us About Coal vs. Renewable Energy

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Winter has a way of showing what engineers describe as margins for error, and contingencies or unexpected events. When the snow on the road makes your car slide before coming to a stop, you lower your driving speed and increase the distance between you and the car in front of you. Read more >

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