Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Latest Science Communication Posts

FURIA, Inc.

Insular Areas Climate Change Act: Cambios para fortalecer la respuesta a los desastres climáticos y proteger poblaciones vulnerables

, Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist

La Dra. Adi Martínez-Román del Centro Legal de Desarrollo de Resiliencia de la Universidad de Puerto Rico es co-autora de este escrito.

Las islas y su gente son más vulnerables a los impactos climáticos que las jurisdicciones continentales y se encuentran más desprotegidas de los estragos climáticos que cada vez son más feroces.  El porqué de su vulnerabilidad está relacionado al cambio climático, pero más directamente al efecto de decisiones humanas.  Es por esto urgente que se atiendan sus problemas de forma decisiva y efectiva, y que no escatimemos en recursos y estrategias para lograr proteger sus entornos ambientales y socio-económicos. Read more >

FURIA, Inc.
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Putting the Politics of COVID-19 “Under the Microscope” via Podcast

Elizabeth Thompson, graduate student, Rockefeller University, , UCS

As a bright-eyed matriculating graduate student entering my PhD at Rockefeller University, I thought I would face two choices upon earning that hard-won degree: academia or industry. 2020 effectively jolted me out of that conventional line of thinking and drove me to search for innovative ways in which scientists can become involved in politics. This different and relatively unexplored career path left me feeling a little lost and unsure where to start. Serendipitously, a fellow first-year graduate student from Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences sent a Slack message asking if anyone in our science policy organization was interested in starting a science policy-based podcast. Being the Gen-Zer that I am, I slid into her DMs and voiced my interest.  Read more >

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Don’t Let Them Fool You: Disinformation Is Not an Accident.

, climate scientist

I recently appeared in a video made by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The video, where I talk about climate science communication, is part of a series on “Countering Science Misinformation.” While recording it, I realized that, while misinformation is the most common type of falsehood in science around us, disinformation is also a common presence, and unlike misinformation, it can have much more serious and deliberate consequences. Read more >

CSD
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For Effective Science Advocacy, Focus on Shared Values, and Speak Up Often

Sheeva Azma, , UCS

Let’s face it, it’s not possible to replace everyone in Congress with scientists and doctors (though, thinking about it, wouldn’t that be such a different world?). Nor need we—the depth of experience from our policymakers is what helps get stuff done in all facets of policy. The best way to hold the government accountable to its mission to protect the public good is for scientists to guide lawmakers to understand the importance of science research. Read more >

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Astrid Caldas speaking at AAAS Stand Up for Science Rally in Feb. 2017 at Boston Copley Square Anthony Eyring/UCS

Who Wants to Learn More about Climate Change? All Kinds of People!

, climate scientist

Some Earth Day 2021 reflections on my work in climate science and advocacy. Read more >

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