Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Will Democratic Candidates Finally Talk About Democracy Tonight?

, Kendall Science Fellow

Ten Democratic presidential candidates will be onstage tonight for their fifth debate, a little more than two months before the first primary votes are cast. One of the sponsors, The Washington Post, has provided details on six key issue areas and candidate positions that may be addressed during the debate, including “government” and “climate change.” Unfortunately there is little indication that there will be any questions about how “government” affects “climate change” and how strengthening democracy will enable us to find better solutions to climate change. That’s a conversation that can expand public interest in and understanding of the link between our democratic institutions and our ability to solve big problems.

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Scientist-Community Advocacy: My Journey and My Advice for You

Dr. Monica E. Unseld, Ph.D, MPH, , UCS

As a grad student, I struggled to find my place. I knew I could transform the world through academia or industry, but I wasn’t convinced those were my only options.

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Lithium Batteries Finally Get their Due with Nobel Prize Win

, Senior energy analyst

Today’s award of  the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the scientists that created lithium ion batteries marks the common heritage of mobile communications (laptops and smart phones), electric vehicles, and a new era in energy storage for our electric system.

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Bringing Science Back to the EPA — Whether EPA Wants it or Not.

, president

The current administration’s attacks on both scientists and science are unprecedented, reaching a new low a few weeks ago when the White House Chief of Staff and the Secretary of Commerce attempted to stifle NOAA employees from giving the public accurate information about the path of Hurricane Dorian. Scientists within the federal government and across the country have struggled to find ways to make sure that their vital work continues in the face of such attacks.

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Genna Reed

The EPA Cut Science Out of Air Pollution Standard-Setting. We’re Putting It Back.

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

EPA leaders have now irreparably damaged the agency’s process for setting health-based air pollution standards. That’s why scientists are taking matters into their own hands. To ensure that independent science informs the particulate matter standards and beyond, the very particulate matter review panel that EPA Administrator Wheeler disbanded last year will reconvene. Read more >

Genna Reed
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