Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Latest Science Communication Posts

Texas Governor Greg Abbott, who banned local jurisdictions in Texas from mandating face coverings in April, reversed himself last week amid the latest spike in COVID-19 infections to issue a statewide mask order. World Travel & Tourism Council/Wikimedia Commons

Blaming the COVID-19 Messengers: Public Health Officials Under Siege

The vilification of public health officials in the COVID-19 crisis reminds us of their vital role as the crossing guards of science. When their vigilance gives us the green light to eat, drink, and recreate, we hardly notice them waving us onto normal activities, barely knowing their names.

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World Travel & Tourism Council/Wikimedia Commons
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10 Things That the Scholarly Community Can Do to Stand in Solidarity

Acknowledge the history. Revise your work. Refuse to be complicit. Read more >

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New COVID-19 Testing Data Reveal 70% More Positive Results in Non-White US Counties

, senior climate scientist

New data compiled and analyzed by UCS shows that in counties with relatively large non-White populations, 70 percent more people test positive for COVID-19 than in predominantly White counties. Read more >

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U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Stephanie Gelardo

Maps Showing Where Most Vulnerable Are Hardest-Hit by COVID-19 in the US Point to Deepening Injustice

, Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist

Environmental hazards threaten people all over the world. Among these are air and water pollution from industrial and toxic hazards, extreme weather events made worse by climate change, and public health threats like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The impacts of these hazards are inequitably distributed among the population, and loss of life and property are usually higher among persons in vulnerable communities.

In this post, I present maps of places where COVID-19 intersects with vulnerable populations. But first, let’s look at the reasons why there are so many inequities in impacts among the population.

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U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Stephanie Gelardo
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Tareq Ismail/Unsplash

Analysis: Voter Fraud Proponents Are Frauds

, Kendall Science Fellow

Allowing Americans to vote by mail does not increase voter fraud. That’s the takeaway from a joint analysis UCS just completed with the UCLA Voting Rights Project and the University of New Mexico’s Center for Social Policy. Voter fraud in US elections continues to be extremely low, and people should not be forced to put their health at risk to exercise their right to vote. Read more >

Tareq Ismail/Unsplash
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