Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Latest Science Communication Posts

The Journal of Science Policy and Governance (JSPG): Engaging early career researchers in science policy

Adriana Bankston and Shalin R. Jyotishi, , UCS

The Journal of Science Policy and Governance (JSPG) was established nearly ten years ago by a small cadre of students and science policy leaders who sought to create an open access, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed platform for early career researchers (ECRs) of all disciplines to publish well-developed policy assessments addressing the widest range of science, technology and innovation policy topics worldwide. Today, JSPG is a non-profit organization that has produced 15 volumes addressing a myriad of policy topics including health, the environment, space, energy, technology, STEM education, and defense, as well as science communications and diplomacy. Read more >

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Photo: Lauren Gerson

Hans von Spakovsky Lies about Voter Fraud. Now He’s Testifying Before Congress

, Kendall Science Fellow

On Tuesday, House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler has called for the first hearings on House Resolution 1, the sweeping anti-corruption and electoral reform bill that is the first introduced in the 116th Congress. Possibly the most important election legislation introduced since the Voting Rights Act of 1965, HR1 would eliminate barriers to voter registration, expand and improves ballot access, implement new cybersecurity standards for voting systems, require independent redistricting commissions, implement new ethics standards, and set up a robust, innovative public campaign finance system.

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Photo: Lauren Gerson
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Photo: Barbara Barrett

The Game is Changing: How Two Years of Trump Has Energized the Science Community

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

There’s never been anything like this. This is the golden age of scientist engagement in America. I have never seen anywhere close to this level of sustained interest in defending the role of science in both societal and individual decisions Read more >

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Photo: Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr

Scientific Integrity and Privacy at Risk in Census

, Kendall Science Fellow

When the Framers of the U.S. Constitution determined that political power should be allocated proportionally based on population and race (as opposed to wealth, heredity, or religion), they needed a scientific means of measuring population. That is the primary reason that we have the Decennial Census, so that population traits can be identified geographically. Since then, the Census has become the largest scientific endeavor that the nation undertakes on a regular basis. In recent days, however, testimony in several court cases challenging the current Administration’s attempt to politicize the Census has revealed an alarming threat to its scientific integrity, and by extension, countless political and economic functions that rely on the Census.

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Photo: Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr
Source: https://americanmigrations.uic.edu/censustools.htm
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Photo by Yomex Owo/Unsplash.

How to Make Professional Conferences More Accessible for Disabled People: Guidance from Actual Disabled Scientists

Gabi Serrato Marks, Ph.D. candidate, , UCS

Attending professional conferences is a key part of life as a scientist. It’s where we present our research, network, and reconnect with colleagues. But for disabled scientists like me, conferences can be inaccessible and frustrating. I talked to several other scientists with a wide range of disabilities about how conferences could be better, and put their advice together in this short summary (also available in a video, if you prefer that). Read more >

Photo by Yomex Owo/Unsplash.
Photo by Matthias Wagner/Unsplash
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