Science Communication

How can scientists make their expertise heard over the din of misinformation? It’s a good question—and our science communication experts have answers.


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Latest Science Communication Posts

Taking Action for Public Science: Re-Imagining Iowa’s Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture

Angie Carter, Ahna Kruzic, and Carrie Chennault, , UCS

On a snowy February morning at the Iowa state capitol in Des Moines, students, farmers, community members, scientists, food system employees, and advocates gathered for a press conference and advocacy day. Their efforts came almost one year to the day after the state legislature voted to defund and shut down the Leopold Center, for 30 years the state’s pre-eminent institution for research, learning and practice on sustainable agriculture. Read more >

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Building Relationships to Promote Science-Based Decision Making

Taryn Black, Michael Diamond, and Emma Kahle, , UCS

In an era when “fake news” has become a common phrase, it is more important than ever to make sure our policymakers are making decisions based on the best available information.

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Federal Scientists! Make a Note for the Record. We All Need to Know of Your Work.

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

To say that federal employees are working in a challenging environment is probably a gross understatement. I’ve heard reports of employees not being allowed to take notes in meetings or told not to use specific words in communications. The Union of Concerned Scientists has reported on scientific advice being sidelined by political staff across a broad range of decisions. As my colleague Joel Clement, formerly of the Department of Interior, said, most career professionals in the agencies just want to do their jobs. Read more >

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Three Ways Fox News Misleads its Readers on Sea Level Rise

, climate scientist

Last week I was quoted in a Fox News article with the headline of “’Arbitrary’ adjustments exaggerate sea level rise, study finds.” Out of the dozens of news pieces I’ve contributed quotes to this year, this one stands out as one of the few–if not the only–written with a climate denial stance. I want to highlight three ways that this particular Fox News piece misleads its audience on the science of sea level rise. Read more >

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Dialogue About Risks of Environmental Exposure Begins with Taking Environmental Justice Concerns Seriously

, Climate Scientist

Public health officials are tasked with one of the most critical jobs in our modern risk society: to research, understand, educate, and help prevent the multiple and complex ways in which people are exposed to and suffer from disease. But when public health officials deflect attention away from significant sources of toxic pollutants that put people at risk (and instead blame the overexposed population’s race, lifestyle, or genetics), they do a disservice to the people they are supposed to protect. Read more >

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