Scientific Integrity

Scientists shouldn’t have to face pressure or harassment from political figures or institutions—but too often they do. Our experts expose attacks on science across the country.


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Latest Scientific Integrity Posts

Can the EPA Protect Us from Ozone and Particulate Pollution Without Its Experts? What to Watch

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

This week, the EPA announced that its Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) alone would be reviewing upcoming ozone and particulate matter reviews. On October 10, the EPA nixed its ozone and particulate matter review panels—breaking with EPA’s use of expert science advisers for ambient air quality decisions since the 1970s and consistent with this administration’s trend of abandoning science advice. Read more >

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Your Guide to Tuesday’s Transformation of Democracy

, Kendall Science Fellow

Democracy in America will be transformed Tuesday night, for better or worse. Or both. In the worst-case scenario, numerous voting rights and electoral reforms will go down in flames across the country, new barriers to voting will be erected, and despite winning millions of more votes, the more popular political party will fall short of winning governing control over the House of Representatives, designed to represent “the People alone,” as James Madison put it. Popular Sovereignty is but a quaint memory, the pillars of democracy crumble, and we submit to our oligarchic overlords. Read more >

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Photo: Diliff/Wikimedia Commons

Scientists Cut Out of EPA’s Particulate Pollution Standard Setting

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

In the latest of several moves targeting EPA air pollution protections, the Trump administration appears to have cut scientists out of a process for reviewing particulate pollution standards.  The move breaks with a longstanding process for how the agency gets independent scientific review into its decisionmaking on air pollution protections. Without such expertise involved, EPA won’t have the best available scientific input to keep people safe from air pollution, as the law requires.

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Photo: Diliff/Wikimedia Commons
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EPA office building with agency flag

The EPA Disbanded Its Office of Science Advisor. Here’s Why That Matters.

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Late last week, the EPA announced its intention to get rid of its Office of the Science Advisor (OSA) and bury its functions deep down in another agency office. This move will significantly diminish efforts to coordinate and standardize the way that EPA does science. The administrator will have significantly less access to scientific advice at normal times and during times of crisis. And it will be easier for agency leaders to sideline and politicize science. Read more >

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What is the Responsible Science Policy Coalition? Here Are Some Clues

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

An interesting new group has popped up called the Responsible Science Policy Coalition (RSPC) that seems to have a significant interest in chemical safety policy. Are they legitimate? As Congress prepares for another hearing into the dangers of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, known as PFAS, it’s worth digging into who these folks might be. Read more >

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