coal ash


Tony Webster/Flickr

The EPA’s New Shameful Tactic: Avoid People Poisoned by Coal Ash

, Research Analyst

Imagine you live next to a coal-fired power plant. Near the power plant, you may have seen heavy machinery dumping loads of greyish substance into an open pit or a pond. You learn that the greyish stuff is called coal ash, a substance that’s chockful of toxic heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, and selenium – all of which are cancer-causing agents – and that 140 million tons of coal ash is produced in the US every year. You may notice that serious health issues are arising in your community, so you can’t help but wonder: is there a connection between your community’s health problems and the dumping of this coal ash? Is this stuff getting into your drinking water?

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Tony Webster/Flickr
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Photo: Sanjay Suchak (used with permission)

This Is What It’s Like to Live Near a Coal Plant in North Carolina

, senior energy analyst

“All we bought from the store was sugar and salt and pepper and we grew everything else, but that all had to stop when the plant was built.” Read more >

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