elections


Chris Phan/Wikimedia Commons

New Study Shows Benefits of Voting by Mail

, Kendall Science Fellow

As we think about how to manage this crisis, a timely new study by political scientists Adam Bonica, ​Jacob M. Grumbach​, Charlotte Hill​ and Hakeem Jefferson demonstrates positive effects on voter turnout from Colorado’s approach to voting: universal vote-by-mail. Read more >

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Omari Spears/UCS

States Need to Update Emergency Election Plans, Scientists Need to Step Up

, Kendall Science Fellow

Even if the U.S. is successful at managing Coronavirus infection rates and lethality, it has the capacity to wreak havoc on the November election. Introducing all this uncertainty into an already close election is sure to amplify claims of voter suppression and voter fraud. If the election is contested and the results inconclusive, the political epidemic could be just as dangerous as the biological one. Read more >

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It’s Time to Ask the Candidates: How Will You Use Science to Protect Everyone?

, Research Analyst

Now that election season is in full swing and presidential candidates are actively seeking out the opinions and viewpoints of voters, we have the rare moment to get their attention about a fundamental issue: the need for science and democracy to aid the public good. This election is an opportunity for positive change—to strengthen the ability of science to inform decisionmaking at the highest levels of our government and ensure that the channels of democracy work better for everyone. Read more >

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Lucas Sankey/Unsplash

Will Democratic Candidates Finally Talk About Democracy Tonight?

, Kendall Science Fellow

Ten Democratic presidential candidates will be onstage tonight for their fifth debate, a little more than two months before the first primary votes are cast. One of the sponsors, The Washington Post, has provided details on six key issue areas and candidate positions that may be addressed during the debate, including “government” and “climate change.” Unfortunately there is little indication that there will be any questions about how “government” affects “climate change” and how strengthening democracy will enable us to find better solutions to climate change. That’s a conversation that can expand public interest in and understanding of the link between our democratic institutions and our ability to solve big problems.

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On the Verge of Another Election, How is Science Political?

, Deputy director, Center for Science & Democracy

Tomorrow is Election Day, and it’s worth reflecting on how a STEM* identity connects with a political identity. The science blog Sister and Science Rising have put together a fantastic new blog series from women scientists exploring how STEM can be political (yet not partisan), and explaining how working in STEM can profoundly shape advocacy work. They are well worth a read as you head to the polls. Read more >

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