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Aaron Huertas

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About the author: Aaron Huertas is a science communications officer at UCS with expertise in helping scientists represent their work to the media and the public. He conducts workshops for scientists and other technical experts and has previously worked at the National Air and Space Museum and for Congressman Jim Saxton (R-NJ). See Aaron’s full bio.

Charles Mann and The Atlantic Miss The Mark in a Confused Climate Change Piece

A recent climate change article by Charles C. Mann in The Atlantic left me scratching my head. The title, “How to Talk About Climate Change So People Will Listen” piqued my interest. It’s something I grapple with every day. But instead of focusing on how our public conversations about climate change are shifting, he lingers on what he sees as failed efforts to enact national climate policy. Mann is a serious and respected writer — who happens to work with some of my favorite magazines — so this piece felt like a missed opportunity. Read More

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CNN’s Climate Coverage Shows Signs of Improvement

Earlier this year, we released an analysis that examined cable news climate coverage from the top three networks. In 2013, CNN aired inaccurate statements about the science in 30 percent of its climate-change-related segments. Such misleading statements usually took place during debates about established science. Guests, including politicians and commentators, also made inaccurate statements about climate science that often went unchallenged. Read More

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Too Many Food Companies Still Attack Science, Despite Push for Greater Transparency

In the age of Twitter and online petitions, food companies are doing more to respond to consumer demand for information about what we’re eating, according to Ad Age. But too often, companies are still sidelining and attacking science at the root of consumers’ concerns. It doesn’t have to be this way. Read More

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Four Questions with Climate Science “Ambassador” Scott Mandia

Scott Mandia has done a lot of work to help climate researchers, especially ones who find themselves in the middle of media and political maelstroms. Read More

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3 Ways Scientists Can Talk About Their Work Without Utterly and Completely Losing Their Audience

“So…what do you do for a living?” It’s a cliché question in Washington, D.C., where I live, but it’s not entirely unheard of outside the Beltway. Read More

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The Power of Positive: Science Communication Lessons from Katharine Hayhoe

Our friend and long-time collaborator Katharine Hayhoe has been named one of TIME Magazine’s 100 most influential people. Obviously, it’s quite an honor and it’s one she richly deserves. To mark the occasion, I wanted to share some lessons about science communication I’ve learned from her that go beyond the basics. Read More

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Reactions to Our Analysis of Climate Science on CNN, Fox, and MSNBC

Reactions to our recent analysis of how cable news networks portray climate science have been interesting, to say the least. Read More

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So… How Does Science Make You Feel?

The “just the facts” approach doesn’t always get the job done when it comes to communicating science. But not every scientist is comfortable talking about their values and beliefs when presenting their work to the public. One technique they can use is to flip the script and ask audiences to talk about their values, instead. Read More

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