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Aaron Huertas

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About the author: Aaron Huertas is a science communications officer at UCS with expertise in helping scientists represent their work to the media and the public. He conducts workshops for scientists and other technical experts and has previously worked at the National Air and Space Museum and for Congressman Jim Saxton (R-NJ). See Aaron’s full bio.

Six Candidates, Three Debates, ZERO Arguments About Climate Science

There was a slight thaw in the climate change debate this month. Six candidates for high office – three Republicans and three Democrats – publicly debated what to do about climate change instead of arguing about the science. Read More

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CNN’s Jake Tapper Asks the Right Question on Climate Change in Florida Governor’s Debate

Too often, journalists ask politicians questions about climate change that only reinforce polarized and misleading messages about climate science. That didn’t happen last night. Read More

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Wall Street Journal Offers a Skewed Climate Perspective from Judith Curry

The Wall Street Journal has published an op-ed from Dr. Judith Curry, a researcher who is often at odds with many of her colleagues when it comes to both the severity of future climate change, as well as how policymakers should view climate risks. Read More

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More Misrepresentations of Climate Science in Legal Briefs Criticizing Michael Mann

The latest round of legal briefs have been filed in climate scientist Michael Mann’s lawsuit against the National Review (NRO) and Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI). Although these documents rehash a lot of arguments about the science I’ve examined previously, some claims jumped out at me. Read More

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Michael Mann Responds to Misleading Filings in Climate Change Lawsuit

Two years ago, a Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) analyst said something incredibly nasty about Penn State University climate researcher Michael Mann: Read More

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3 Reasons You Don’t Want to Communicate About Your Research but Absolutely Should

Many scientists are understandably reticent when it comes to communicating their work or engaging in the policymaking process. I sympathize — truly, I do! — but here’s why I think you should go for it anyway. Read More

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Charles Mann and The Atlantic Miss The Mark in a Confused Climate Change Piece

A recent climate change article by Charles C. Mann in The Atlantic left me scratching my head. The title, “How to Talk About Climate Change So People Will Listen” piqued my interest. It’s something I grapple with every day. But instead of focusing on how our public conversations about climate change are shifting, he lingers on what he sees as failed efforts to enact national climate policy. Mann is a serious and respected writer — who happens to work with some of my favorite magazines — so this piece felt like a missed opportunity. Read More

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CNN’s Climate Coverage Shows Signs of Improvement

Earlier this year, we released an analysis that examined cable news climate coverage from the top three networks. In 2013, CNN aired inaccurate statements about the science in 30 percent of its climate-change-related segments. Such misleading statements usually took place during debates about established science. Guests, including politicians and commentators, also made inaccurate statements about climate science that often went unchallenged. Read More

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Too Many Food Companies Still Attack Science, Despite Push for Greater Transparency

In the age of Twitter and online petitions, food companies are doing more to respond to consumer demand for information about what we’re eating, according to Ad Age. But too often, companies are still sidelining and attacking science at the root of consumers’ concerns. It doesn’t have to be this way. Read More

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Four Questions with Climate Science “Ambassador” Scott Mandia

Scott Mandia has done a lot of work to help climate researchers, especially ones who find themselves in the middle of media and political maelstroms. Read More

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