Brenda Ekwurzel

Senior climate scientist

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Brenda Ekwurzel is a senior climate scientist and the director of climate science at UCS. She has expertise on many aspects of climate variability, including the Arctic Ocean and sea ice, wildfires, groundwater, and coastal erosion. She holds a Ph.D. in isotope geochemistry from Columbia University (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory). See Brenda's full bio.

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Brenda's Latest Posts

What’s the Connection Between Climate Change and Hurricane Harvey?

As Hurricane Harvey slipped back offshore of Texas and then like a pinwheel spun back over to Louisiana and is now moving further inland on a northeast trajectory, questions are already being asked: Is this storm unprecedented? Are there telltale signs of climate change? Read more >

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US Abandons Global Science Leadership, Zeroes Out IPCC Funding

In stark contrast to the leadership role the US has historically contributed to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the enacted 2017 U.S. Budget zeroes out funding for the institution.  Read more >

IPCC; USD conversion R. Licker
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Space observations help monitor toxic algal blooms that affect shellfish in Maine. Photo: Henry Zbyszynski CC-BY-2.0 (Flickr).

Maine Benefits From Space Observations: Will Congress Axe Them?

The U.S. House of Representatives appropriations committee approved of a budget that, according to figures my colleague Hannah Nesser calculated, includes over a quarter cut from NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Systems Acquisition funding compared to previous fiscal year enacted level.  What exactly is on the chopping block for this and other cuts to NOAA and NASA?  Are any vital to key economic sectors in Maine?

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Photo by Erika Spanger-Siegfried
NESDIS/NOAA
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We Fact-Checked a Bogus “Study” on Global Temperature That’s Misleading Readers

Independent peer-review of scientific research by qualified experts lies at the heart of progress in our understanding of how the natural world works. And posting proposed new scientific findings on the internet without peer-review can lead to some wildly incorrect conclusions being promoted as true. Read more >

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A wide view of the rift in Larsen C from the vantage point of NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft. NASA scientist John Sonntag snapped the photos on November 10, 2016, during an Operation IceBridge flight. Photo: NASA

One of The Largest Icebergs on Record Just Broke off Antarctica. Now What?

An iceberg, among the largest on record (since satellites started tracking in 1978), broke off the Larsen-C ice shelf along the Antarctic Peninsula.  The iceberg is greater than the area of Delaware and a volume twice that of Lake Erie.  What were the origins of this event, and now what?

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IPCC 2013 WG 1 Figure 4-25
Ted Scambos NSIDC NASA
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