Join
Search

David Wright

http://blog.ucsusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/david-wright-95px.jpg

About the author: David Wright is a physicist and the co-director of the Global Security Program. He is a nationally known expert on the technical aspects of missile defense systems, missile proliferation, and space weapons. See David's full bio.

Then vs Now: Progress on Nuclear Weapons since the End of the Cold War

The Cold War ended 25 years ago this month, according to many historians. On Dec. 2 and 3, 1989, Presidents Bush and Gorbachev met on a ship off the island of Malta in the Mediterranean and announced an end of hostilities between the United States and the Soviet Union.

The two presidents quickly turned to addressing the most dangerous legacy of the Cold War: the bloated nuclear arsenals in both countries. Within a few years, they cut their nuclear stockpiles in half, and have continued to cut them in the decades since. With U.S.-Russian tensions high again, it’s worth remembering what progress has been made. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Taking Nuclear Missiles off Hair-Trigger Alert

A recent New York Times editorial, Wresting with an Aging Arsenal, reiterates a key point UCS has been making about U.S. nuclear weapons policy: it’s stuck in the past—a carry-over from a different era that does not address the main threats in today’s world. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Hiroshima, Hair-Trigger, and Existential Risks

Incredibly, “existential risks”—those that could end humanity—threaten us every day.

That’s the conclusion of a recent Washington Post article. What risk tops the list? Read More

Bookmark and Share

Nuclear Power Regulator Sticks Its Head Further into the Ground

An ostrich is a clichéd symbol of people making bird-brained decisions that ignore reality. But it’s hard to think of something more apt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sometimes. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Accidents Happen—They Shouldn’t Lead to Nuclear Disaster

Sunday evening the news show 60 Minutes aired an exposé on some of the problems that have surfaced recently about U.S. nuclear weapons. It’s a jaw-dropping story that few people know much about. Read More

Categories: Nuclear Weapons  

Tags: ,   

Bookmark and Share

New Book “Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster” Released

This week we officially released our book Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster, published by New Press and co-authored by UCS nuclear experts Dave Lochbaum and Ed Lyman, and journalist Susan Q. Stranahan. Susan for many years was a journalist with the Philadelphia Inquirer, and was the lead reporter of the Inquirer’s Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident. Read More

Categories: Nuclear Power  

Tags: ,   

Bookmark and Share

Climate Change and Nuclear Power

The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) recently received by email an open letter by four nuclear scientists and engineers—Andrew C. Kadak, Richard A. Meserve, Neil E. Todreas, and Richard Wilson—titled “Nuclear Power’s Role in Responding to Climate Change.” Below we look at some of their arguments. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Ambassador Jonathan Dean: 1924-2014

The arms control community lost one of its true heroes recently with the passing of Ambassador Jonathan Dean. My colleagues and I at UCS remember him especially fondly. Read More

Categories: Nuclear Weapons  

Tags: ,   

Bookmark and Share

Senate Nuclear Waste Bill: No Near-Term Benefit for Public Safety

Third of 3 posts on spent fuel safety

The Senate Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) Committee is set to consider a waste management bill for nuclear power reactors—the Nuclear Waste Administration Act—in mid-December. The authors argue that their bill is urgently needed to protect the public since nuclear waste currently stored at reactor sites poses a safety risk that must be reduced now.

However, in its current form the legislation does not address the near-term risks of nuclear waste storage at reactor sites. It would therefore do nothing to increase public safety for the foreseeable future. Read More

Bookmark and Share

Nuclear Fuel and the Titanic Principle

This is the second of 3 posts on spent fuel safety

In my previous post I talked about how spent fuel is piling up in cooling pools at reactors across the country. Since 100 million Americans—a third of the U.S. population—live within 50 miles of a spent fuel pool, reducing the risks to those people should be a high priority. Read More

Bookmark and Share