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Jeff Deyette

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About the author: Jeff Deyette is a senior energy analyst with expertise on the economic and environmental implications of renewable energy and energy efficiency policies at the state and federal level. He holds a master’s degree in energy resource and environmental management & international relations. See Jeff's full bio.

As EPA Hearings Begin, Colorado Makes Strides toward Reducing Carbon Emissions

On July 30, I will be testifying in support of the EPA’s power plant carbon standard at a hearing in Denver. As one of four locations where the EPA will be seeking public comment on the draft rule this week, Colorado is a mighty fine choice. The Rocky Mountain State is well positioned to exceed its proposed carbon emissions reduction target and serves as an excellent example of how a state can successfully transition toward a low-carbon, clean energy economy. Read More

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EPA Carbon Standard Opens the Door for Renewables, Now States Must Take Them over the Threshold

This week the EPA released its draft power plant carbon standard, and renewable energy was included as one of the technologies that states can use for reducing CO2 emissions. That’s terrific news for wind, solar, and other renewable energy technologies, which are already demonstrating they’re capable of ramping up in a big way. But in order to keep the U.S. moving toward a truly low-carbon economy, states must seize the opportunity and make renewables a cornerstone of their compliance plans. Read More

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Earth Day Ideas: Looking for Air Leaks in all the Right Places

Still looking for an impactful Earth Day activity? You could do a lot worse than enlisting the family to spend a few hours finding and sealing up air leaks in and around your home. While often considered a fall-time endeavor, air sealing now can make a discernible difference with the hot summer months right around the corner. It’s one of the quickest, easiest, and most cost-effective ways to lower your carbon emissions and get a little Cooler and Smarter in the process. Here’s the why and how. Read More

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Cashing in on Earth Day: 10 Activities to Kick-start Low-Carbon Living and Save You Money

With Earth Day just a week away, there is no better time to be thinking about steps you and your family can take to protect the environment and our climate. And the most impactful steps are often the ones that cut your carbon emissions and save you money. Read More

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Kansas House of Representatives Says “no” to Attack on Renewable Electricity Standard

Great news out of Kansas! Just one day after the Kansas Senate voted to repeal the state’s renewable electricity standard (RES), the House of Representatives sent the measure packing by an overwhelming 77-44 vote margin. This is a victory for renewable energy in Kansas and across the nation. It is also yet another direct rebuke to the shady tactics and misleading cost analysis put forth by clean energy opponents like Americans for Prosperity, Heartland Institute, and ALEC; all of which are funded by the Kansas-based Koch brothers. Read More

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Renewable Energy Opponents at it Again in Kansas, but Wind (and Solar!) Power Forge Ahead

ALEC and their fossil fuel-funded cohorts are taking yet another crack at undermining renewable energy policy in Kansas. Fortunately, their ill-conceived antics are not distracting wind and solar development from moving full steam ahead. Read More

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Even as Coal Use Declines, Most States Are Still Dependent on Coal Imports

The use of coal to produce electricity in the United States has been declining in recent years. Yet for most states still heavily dependent on coal-fired power, the cost of importing coal continues to be a drain on local economies. According to a new Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) analysis, 37 states were net importers of coal in 2012, paying a total of $19.4 billion to import 433 million tons of coal from other states and even some foreign countries. Instead of sending billions of ratepayer dollars out of those states year after year, consumers would be better served by investing more in local renewable energy development and energy efficiency measures. Read More

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Ripe for Retirement: Examining the Competitiveness of U.S. Coal Plants

This is Part One of a 3-Part Blog Series.

Today, the Union of Concerned Scientists released an update of our 2012 ground-breaking analysis, Ripe for Retirement, examining the economic viability of U.S. coal generators compared with modern, cleaner alternatives. Our new findings, published in Electricity Journal, show that nearly 59 gigawatts (GW) of coal power capacity are not cost competitive when compared with natural gas, and more than 71 GW are uneconomic when compared with wind power. These coal generators are prime candidates for retirement and their closure would provide substantial benefits for consumers and the environment. It would also accelerate the transition to a cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy system. Read More

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TVA Pulls the Plug on More Coal Plants; Others Will Surely Follow

Last week, the Tennessee Valley Authority’s (TVA) board of directors voted in favor of retiring 3,300 megawatts (MW) of coal power capacity. This action is good news for consumers and the environment in the region. It also continues the drumbeat of retirement announcements nationwide and provides further evidence of the eroding economic viability of the aging U.S. coal fleet. A recent UCS analysis, Ripe for Retirement, documents why many more U.S. coal generators should also be considered for closure. Read More

Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels  

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Fact Checking ALEC’s Attacks on Ohio’s Clean Energy Standards

Members of the Ohio Senate Public Utilities Committee heard testimony this week on two bills that would roll back Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards. Backed by fossil-fuel funded special interest groups and their political allies, these proposals would undermine Ohio’s emerging clean energy industries and make the state even more dependent on coal and natural gas. Read More

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