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John Rogers

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About the author: John Rogers is a senior energy analyst with expertise in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and policies. He co-manages the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) at UCS that looks at water demands of energy production in the context of climate change. He holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Princeton University. See John's full bio.

Energy Efficiency in Florida: It’s Working Elsewhere, So Let’s Keep Not Doing It

Recent decisions by Florida’s utility regulation commission mean that the state is leaving key energy resources on the cutting room floor. Here’s why the Sunshine State is way in the dark on this one. Read More

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Carbon Capture, Water, and the U.S.-China Climate Agreement

The just-announced U.S.-China climate agreement is reason to celebrate—it’s a, as UCS’s Ken Kimmell puts it, “truly historic agreement” and “a welcome breakthrough.” For those with an interest in energy-water connections and collisions, the agreement commits both countries to a project focused on reducing the negative water implications of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Here’s why we’re even talking about water around CCS, and what this accord says about that the issue. Read More

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Coal, Carbon, and Compliance: Why Pennsylvania’s EPA Regulations Bill Isn’t the End of the Ballgame

Pennsylvania’s legislature finished off its fall session with a bill on the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. At a time when climate leadership, not obstructionism, is called for, it’s no step forward. But it’s not the step backward that it might have been. Here’s why. Read More

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Installing Solar Panels on Your Roof: Prices Dropping, Solar Hopping

Two new reports have a wealth of information about the cost of rooftop solar in the United States. Here are six important cost-related takeaways, with a whole lot of great news. Read More

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Another Faulty New York Times Op-ed: 5 Reasons Why an Attack on LEDs Is Way Off the Mark

An op-ed in today’s New York Times from Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus tries to throw cold water on this week’s exciting announcement of the Nobel Prize for Physics being awarded for blue LEDs, which made white LEDs possible and increasingly ubiquitous. This op-ed comes on the heels of a similar NYT-published contrarian piece on trees and climate change. Today’s, sadly, is similarly misguided. Here are five reasons why their critique is way off the mark. Read More

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Dorks for LEDs, Unite! 5 Reasons Why the 2014 Nobel Physics Prize is Right On

Great news from Stockholm this morning: the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for an invention that made white LEDs possible. In talking about this story today, NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel said he’s “kind of a dork for LED lighting,” and I’ll readily admit I’m one. Here are five reasons why you might want to be one, too. Read More

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The Cost of Installing Solar Panels: Plunging Prices, and What They Mean For You

Installing rooftop solar panels has never been more affordable. UCS’s new solar infographic highlights the remarkable drop in the cost of rooftop solar in recent years, and how people are getting systems for even less, or even for zero dollars down. Here’s how the numbers add up (or down), and why—and how you can get in on the action.

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The Economist Ignores Reality, Highlights Flawed Renewable Energy Study

A recent article in The Economist covers a study comparing the costs of solar, wind, hydro, nuclear, and natural gas. Alas, the study starts with a fundamental misunderstanding of how our electricity system works, and goes  downhill from there. And The Economist’s attention unfortunately helps to perpetuate those errors. Here are five examples of what went wrong. Read More

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Solar Power on the Rise: Rooftop Solar, Large-Scale PV, CSP, and the Solar Revolution

Shining. Soaring. Skyrocketing. Solar is so exciting, we’re running out of adjectives.

The what, the why, and the where-to of America’s solar power revolution are the subjects of a new UCS report and infographic. It’s a story worth celebrating.

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Clean Energy Leaders and Laggards: How Utilities Stack Up

Utilities are lynchpins in moving us toward the clean energy future we need to see. But how quickly they’re helping us move in that direction varies greatly. A really useful new report from Ceres and Clean Edge looks at who’s leading and who’s lagging among U.S. utilities. Read More

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