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John Rogers

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About the author: John Rogers is a senior energy analyst with expertise in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and policies. He co-manages the Energy and Water in a Warming World Initiative (EW3) at UCS that looks at water demands of energy production in the context of climate change. He holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Princeton University. See John's full bio.

And the Cheapest Electricity in the U.S. Is… Solar?

A Nevada utility and a solar developer have just struck a deal for solar electricity at a price that stands out compared not just to other solar deals, but also to just about any other option for new electricity. Here’s what it and other recent deals say about the future of solar. Read More

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5 Reasons Obama’s New Solar Access Initiative Is Welcome News

The Obama administration has just announced a new initiative to “increase access to solar energy for all Americans, in particular low- and moderate- income communities, while expanding opportunities to join the solar workforce.” Here are five reasons why this effort matters. Read More

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Summer, Solar, and an Iceberg of Excuses: Why I Don’t Have Rooftop Solar (and Why I’m Wrong)

I’ve got a confession to make: For all the talking I do about solar and the solar revolution underway, I haven’t thrown my hat in the solar ring. An iceberg-sized collection of excuses stands between me and Solardom, and my homeowner-ship is hesitant to steam past them. But here’s why my excuses might just be hogwash, and how that iceberg might just melt away under the summer sun. Read More

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New Flawed Study of the Clean Power Plan: How the MISI Study Gets It So Wrong

An op-ed in yesterday’s Investor’s Business Daily uses a new study to make unsubstantiated claims about the economic impacts of the proposed Clean Power Plan on vulnerable communities. Since the op-ed didn’t provide a link to the actual analysis, we hunted it down and took a look behind the headlines. And when we did, we found that the foundations of this new “analysis” are shaky indeed. Read More

Categories: Energy, Global Warming  

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Which Cities Are Most Energy Efficient? Boston, NYC, and DC Take Top Honors

ACEEE has just released its ranking of U.S. cities’ performance on energy efficiency. Their analysis shows some strong performers, and plenty of room for improvement. Read More

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The EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Setting the Record Straight on the Benefits and Costs

We’re working hard to set the record straight on disinformation about the Clean Power Plan, the first-ever national limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants under the Clean Air Act. It’s not hard to find fodder: there’s plenty of misleading stuff out there, and some of it has gotten way more airtime than it should have. To fight back, colleagues and I gave a webinar recently on the really wrong conclusions some studies have come to on the Clean Power Plan, and how they got it so far off the mark.

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Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming  

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Annual Energy Outlook 2015: EIA Consistently Lowballs Renewables, Undercuts Climate Change Efforts

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration is about to publish its annual best guess as to what the future will hold, energy-wise. But if the past is any guide, their best guess is likely to lowball renewable energy’s potential contribution. That has real implications for our nation’s efforts to tackle climate change. Here’s what to watch for when the 2015 Annual Energy Outlook comes out, and why it matters. Read More

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Portland Sunnier Than Houston? Solar Power Resources Are More Widespread Than You Think…

The spring equinox is a fine time to celebrate the sun. And, for the solar power lovers among us, it’s a great time to take stock of how much sun is available for rooftop solar across the country.

When we do, we find that, over the course of the year, the sun for solar power generation is actually much more evenly distributed than sunny-Southwest-postcards-vs.-Northern-snow-scenes would suggest. It’s also more evenly spread than typical solar maps would lead you to believe. Here’s a better way to see how much you’ve got. Read More

Categories: Energy, Science Communication  

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Solar Power, Solar Donuts, and a Landmark 20-Gigawatt Milestone

I’m just back from the annual PV America conference, where the talk was all about the great stuff happening, solar-wise, and what it’ll take to keep it going. And now the official industry figures for U.S. solar’s 2014 performance have just come out, putting some hard numbers—and donuts—on the table. And there’s a lot of good news in there. Read More

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Heart of Science: Leonard Nimoy, 1931-2015

As the eulogistic outpourings of the last few days show, Leonard Nimoy’s death has touched many people in this country and beyond, including those of us with a science bent and a strong affinity for a certain Vulcan. His most famous character says a lot about how to move forward on some issues of monumental importance. Read More

Categories: Science Communication  

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