Josh Goldman

Policy analyst, Clean Vehicles

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Josh Goldman is a policy analyst and leads legislative and regulatory campaigns to help develop and advance policies that reduce U.S. oil use. See Josh's full bio.

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How to Calculate Electric Vehicle Emissions by ZIP Code and Model

Internet! As you may have heard, the UCS Clean Vehicles squad just released a new report that definitively answers the question: are electric vehicles (EVs) cleaner than gas-powered vehicles? After two years of gathering and crunching data, we found that the average battery electric vehicle sold today is responsible for less than half the global warming emissions of comparable gasoline-powered vehicles.

So yes, EVs are awesome for the environment – and your wallet. But just how awesome? To help you #humblebrag about how clean EVs are in your neck of the woods, we developed this handy online tool that calculates emissions for almost every EV on the market for every zipcode in the U.S. Check it out and share it with your networks. I’ll give you unlimited internet points. Read more >

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New Electric Vehicles for 2016: Chevy Volt, Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model X

Looking to start the new year with a new vehicle? Begin your obsessive internet research by reading the following recap of updates to the 2016 Chevy Volt and Nissan LEAF, both electric vehicles that can seriously cut your transportation emissions while saving you some coin on fuel. I also preview the all-new Tesla Model X, debuting at a high price point but with features that could justify its six-figure price tag. Read more >

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Green Guilt, Really? A Response to Slate’s Daniel Gross and the Concept of Green Privilege

Slate contributor Daniel Gross suffers from a bad case of green guilt. Not to be confused with Catholic or Jewish guilt, green guilt arises from green privilege, which Gross defines as having access to public benefits that “flow almost exclusively to individuals who are already well off and don’t need the help.”

The most glaring example of green privilege, Gross argues, is the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles (EVs). Not only are federal and state tax credits for EVs helping yuppies save money on fuel and reduce their emissions, but Gross’s town of Westport, Connecticut is allowing EV drivers to get preferential parking at train stations too. Oh the horror! Someone get this guy a gas guzzler and a crappy parking spot, stat! Read more >

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The New Electric Car from KIA: Review of a 2015 Kia Soul EV Test Drive

If you’re looking for a new car, you’ve got to test drive an electric vehicle (EV). Just do it. Sure, you can read about how EVs provide instant torque, are cleaner and cheaper to drive than gas vehicles, and can fit the needs of 42 percent of American drivers, but the best way to understand the allure of an EV is to go drive one.

I recently took the 2015 Kia Soul EV home for lunch, and was amazed at how much I enjoyed driving on electricity. I’ve previously driven several EVs, but never alone, and never for an extended period of time. Having the Soul EV for a couple hours allowed me to better understand what, exactly, it would be like to own an EV – and I loved every minute of it. Read more >

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Comparing Electric Vehicles: Review of a 2015 BMW i3 Test Drive

I recently test drove the BMW i3, a quirky addition to the expanding variety of electric vehicles (EVs) hitting showrooms across the U.S. and was impressed at the i3’s ability to handle city driving.  But is the i3 the “ultimate driving experience?” Read on to find out. Read more >

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