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Could Lima Mark a Climate Turning Point? What to Look For

With the historic climate march in New York, and pledges by the world’s three largest emitters—China, the United States, and the 28 countries of the European Union—to cap or cut emissions, I’m already on record as suggesting that the fall of 2014 could be a turning point in the international effort to address global warming.

The momentum seems to be building.  Read More

Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming  

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The Proposed Bailout for Ohio’s Coal Plants: A Bad Idea Any Way You Look at It

Ohio’s three biggest electricity providers are asking the state to approve a bailout plan that would force Ohioans to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in extra charges to keep some of the nation’s oldest, dirtiest, and least efficient power plants operating. If the proposals are approved, electricity costs for Ohioans will rise as consumers are forced to pay extra to maintain the Buckeye State’s risky over-reliance on coal. Read More

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Here’s a Utility Hiding Some Facts About the EPA Clean Power Plant Rule

ERCOT, the electricity reliability organization for Texas, distorts the impacts of the EPA power plant carbon rules 111(d) by leaving out any context in its recent report. Read More

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Debunking an Attack on Energy Efficiency and the Clean Power Plan: NERA Study Falsely Inflates Costs

A recent study conducted by NERA Economic Consulting — funded in part by fossil fuel industry trade groups — falsely inflates the cost of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan by denying energy efficiency’s proven ability to save consumers money. Here’s what they got wrong, and why it matters. Read More

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Carbon Capture, Water, and the U.S.-China Climate Agreement

The just-announced U.S.-China climate agreement is reason to celebrate—it’s a, as UCS’s Ken Kimmell puts it, “truly historic agreement” and “a welcome breakthrough.” For those with an interest in energy-water connections and collisions, the agreement commits both countries to a project focused on reducing the negative water implications of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Here’s why we’re even talking about water around CCS, and what this accord says about that the issue. Read More

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Good News for the Climate: U.S. & China Agree to Cut Emissions (Finally!)

One day, when historians look back to pick the time when the world finally woke up and decided to address global warming, that time may well be the fall of 2014. First, the march in New York drew 400,000 people and many thousands more across the globe to demand that our leaders take action on climate change. And today, the United States and China announced a truly historic agreement to cut emissions of carbon dioxide.
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Clean or Dirty? Fighting Over the EPA Clean Power Plan Gets Messy

What should we think when two grid reliability authorities look at large-scale adoption of renewable energy and come to opposite conclusions? This isn’t pretty and we need to get to the bottom of it. Read More

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What Happens When Solar Energy is Cheaper Than Local Electricity Prices?

The future keeps changing! Banks are telling us that solar energy is becoming mainstream. 

UCS projects that for more than half of the states in the U.S., solar power on your roof is going to be cheaper than the price of electricity delivered by the utility company. Deutsche Bank reports the number will be 36 states in 2016, or 47 states if federal tax credits continue as they are today. Read More

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The Day After: What the Mid-Terms Mean and How To Move Forward

While this morning’s headlines naturally focus on the change in leadership in the U.S. Senate, nothing in the results should change anyone’s mind on these clear truths: we know Americans trust science, support cutting global warming emissions, and want help for communities struggling with the very real consequences of climate change.   Read More

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The IPCC’s New Climate Science Guide for the Perplexed Policymaker

It is remarkable how many U.S. elected officials appear to be baffled about climate change these days. Despite the long scientific consensus that emissions of heat-trapping gases from burning fossil fuels and other human activities are driving disruptive changes to Earth’s climate, “I am not a scientist” has recently become the response that some members of Congress, governors, and other politicians are now giving to questions about whether they think climate change is a problem.

If you are a confused policymaker, perhaps fearful of answering the question incorrectly, fear no longer. The world’s leading climate scientists have just created a handy guide for you. Read More

Categories: Energy, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming  

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