Food and Agriculture

We need to fix our broken food system—and science can help us do it. UCS food experts highlight solutions to ensure that every American has access to healthy, green, fair, affordable food.


Subscribe to our Food and Agriculture feed

Latest Food and Agriculture Posts

fa-sustainable-soil-cross-section
Photo: USDA-NRCS

On World Soils Day, Five Fun Facts About the Underdog of Natural Resources

, Kendall Science Fellow

Happy World Soils Day! We seem to hear a lot about the importance of clean water and clean air, but soils less frequently get the attention they deserve. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

reveal_sugarDV

The Big Three Threats to Progress on Added Sugar Transparency

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

The FDA’s revisions to the nutrition facts label, which we celebrated in May, could now be under siege on a few different fronts. Read more >

house.gov
Bookmark and Share

fa-blog-bananas

Battling Climate Change With Each Bite: 4 Things To Do If You’re Going Bananas About the Story Behind Your Food

, agroecologist

I have a challenge for you. Take a moment, and consider what you ate for breakfast. As routine as it may have felt, dig beneath the surface and I’ll bet you’ll find a story that’s anything but mundane. It might even be magical. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

fa-blog-turkey
Photo: Ruocaled/flickr

On Thanksgiving, Trump, and Cheap Food

, senior analyst, Food and Environment

Just in time for the most delicious holiday of them all, UCS has launched a new video featuring Mark Bittman in the kitchen. He’s cooking up a tasty whole grain dish with fall favorites—savory butternut squash, fresh cranberries, whole grains, and a touch of maple syrup—and talking about the sorry state of the US food system, and why our new president needs to take action to fix it.

Okay, I know what you’re thinking. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

fa-blog-cedar-river-flood

The Second Worst Flooding in Iowa History That You Probably Didn’t Read About

, Kendall Science Fellow

“No news is good news” was a take-home message from heavy rains that soaked Northern Iowa in late September, raising river levels to their second highest mark ever. Thanks to proactive work of emergency responders, community leaders, flood scientists and eager volunteers, there were not damages on the scale of other recent deadly floods in Louisiana and North Carolina.

However, the increasing intensity and frequency of heavy rainfall means that the damages escaped this time around should not lead to complacency. Rather, even more proactive planning will be required, particularly in agricultural areas, in order to prevent future floods from making headlines. Read more >

Bookmark and Share