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Does Domino Sugar Want You to Swallow Sugar-coated Science—All for a Good Cause?

A smoker-friendly tobacco festival to prevent lung cancer. A car rally to reduce air pollution. A mud wrestling contest to improve hygiene. Or, how about a bake sale to solve malnutrition and hunger in America? Read More

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The Colorado Oil and Gas Task Force: Still a Chance for Science to Inform Fracking Policy

When news broke last month that the state of Colorado would be creating a blue-ribbon task force to study the impacts and inform regulation of hydraulic fracturing in the state, I wrote about the opportunity for science. In a state that has been ground zero in the fracking debate in many ways, this is a chance, I wrote, for Colorado to take a step back and consider how science can better inform oil and gas development there. Unfortunately, yesterday’s announcement of the task force membership shows this has yet to be the case. Read More

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Sugar Association Sweet-Talks Attendees at a Diabetes Conference

“Sugar gets a bad rap.”

According to the Sugar Association, this was, apparently, the sentiment expressed by a majority of the attendees that stopped by the trade group’s booth earlier this summer at the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Annual Meeting. Read More

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How Can Conservation Scientists Make Their Expertise More Resonant? Apply for the New Wilburforce Fellowship

Conservation scientists take note: there’s a new, exciting fellowship program for scientists who want to develop the skills and connections necessary to help local communities develop solutions to current conservation challenges in the western United States and Canada. The application deadline is September 30, 2014. Read More

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Where Is the Wastewater Going? How Better Data Can Make Us More Resilient

Guest Bogger

Omar Malik, Indicators Research Coordinator
University of Maryland

College Park, MD

According to the United Nations, up to 90 percent of the developing world’s wastewater does not get treated before it goes back into the environment. That’s a staggering statistic, especially considering the implications of untreated wastewater and the huge importance of good water management today. Read More

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On the SEC Disclosure Rule, the People Have Spoken

One million comments. Today I’m celebrating one million comments.  What’s the significance of one million comments? Let me explain. Read More

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Michael Mann Responds to Misleading Filings in Climate Change Lawsuit

Two years ago, a Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) analyst said something incredibly nasty about Penn State University climate researcher Michael Mann: Read More

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Science Diplomacy and Subtle Ways of Discouraging International Collaboration

Yellow fever killed hundreds of thousands of people and sickened many more throughout the 19th Century, and nobody knew for sure how it was spread or how to contain it. It was the most dreaded disease in the Americas, creating mass panic and destroying commerce. Read More

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3 Reasons You Don’t Want to Communicate About Your Research but Absolutely Should

Many scientists are understandably reticent when it comes to communicating their work or engaging in the policymaking process. I sympathize — truly, I do! — but here’s why I think you should go for it anyway. Read More

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A Funny Thing Happened at the Fish and Wildlife Service: The Wolverine Endangered Species Listing

What does the wolverine have to do with climate change? No, the X-men haven’t decided to #ActOnClimate (yet), but the two are very much related.  Wolverines are mammals that live in snowy terrain of the mountain West, and they are currently threatened by climate change, at least according to some scientists. But if you ask the decision makers at the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), you might get a different story. Read More

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