Science and Democracy

The partnership between science and democracy has played a huge role in U.S. history. But misinformation and attacks on science have strained that partnership. UCS science and democracy experts keep you informed on the latest developments, from Capitol Hill to local communities.


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Latest Science and Democracy Posts

How Does Your Whiteness Inform Your Climate Work? Fair Question.

, senior analyst, Climate & Energy Program

This past weekend, I had the honor and challenge of presenting at the Fifth Annual Climate Conference of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). For the past three years, UCS has been proud to be one of the sponsors of this summit at Dillard University, in New Orleans, and we’re looking forward to continuing to support it in years to come.

For me personally, this year’s event took an important turn when a Howard University student stood up and posed a good, hard question: How does your whiteness inform your work on climate change? Read more >

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Monsanto’s Four Tactics for Undermining Glyphosate Science Review

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Emails unsealed in a California lawsuit last week reveal that agribusiness giant Monsanto engaged in activities aimed at undermining efforts to evaluate a potential link between glyphosate—the active ingredient of the company’s popular herbicide Roundup—and cancer. The documents reveal the company’s plans to seed the scientific literature with a ghostwritten study, and its efforts to delay and prevent US government assessments of the product’s safety. Read more >

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You Can Support Science and Push Back Against the Anti-Science Agenda: Here’s How

Cynthia Leifer, , UCS

Dazed and confused is not a phrase typically used to describe scientists, yet many of us are feeling that way in the wake of the dramatic policy changes implemented in the first few months of the new government administration. A seemingly endless flurry of executive orders impact everything from what science is funded, what government scientists can talk about, what areas of science are considered appropriate for presentation on the official White House website, and who can work in our labs. Read more >

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When I March for Science, I’ll March for Equity, Inclusion, and Access

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

We are on the verge of something big. Scientists as a group are politically engaged like never before. They are communicating with decisionmakers, ready to march, and ready to run for office. The March for Science—an event that formed organically by a few enthusiastic people on Reddit and snowballed from there—is slated to be the largest demonstration for science that this country has ever seen. I’ve personally been blown away by the unprecedented support for scientists in the streets. Read more >

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The Safety of Coal Miners—and Every Worker in America—Is at Risk

, executive director

States are clearly emboldened by the anti-regulatory, industry-first furor coming from the White House and Congress, a furor that could affect your workplace as well. Read more >

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