Latest Uncategorized Posts

The Senate Tax Bill: Just Say No

, director of strategy & policy

By the end of this week, the Senate is expected to vote on the tax cut bill. At least six Republican Senators are reported to have serious concerns about the bill, either because they fear it would add too much to the deficit or because it favors large corporations more than small business owners. If three or more of those Senators end up opposing the bill (and no Democrats break ranks and support it), the bill will die.  For the reasons outlined below, it should. Read more >

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Our nation’s oldest, largest, and most highly respected public health organization—The American Public Health Association—begins its 2017 conference on November 4. Photo: Courtesy of APHA

On Climate Change, a Major Public Health Conference Stands in Stark Contrast to the Trump Administration

, executive director

The Trump administration may be hell-bent on sidelining any effort to address global climate change—or even have an intelligent conversation about it—but the public health community is having none of it.  Read more >

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Flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

New Bill Puts Environmental Justice Right Where It Belongs: Front and Center

, Kendall Science Fellow

We’re helping research, document, amplify, offer policy advice on, and in some cases litigate, the ways in which environmental injustices disproportionately expose low-income communities of color to dangerous toxic chemicals, climate change, water and air pollution, to name a few. Read more >

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This is the extent of flooding from Hurricane Sandy in Cape May, NJ (left) vs. the area that would flood twice monthly by 2100 due to sea level rise (right)

This Is Your Planet on Sea Level Rise. Any Questions?

, climate scientist

There are moments when your own data stops you dead in your tracks. I had one of those moments a few months ago. Read more >

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Voting Technology Needs an Upgrade: Here’s What Congress Can Do

, Kendall Science Fellow

Voting systems throughout the United States are vulnerable to corruption in a variety of ways, and the federal government has an obligation to protect the integrity of the electoral process. At a recent meeting of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s Committee on the Future of Voting, the Department of Homeland Security’s Robert Kolasky put it bluntly: “It’s not a fair fight to pit Orange County (California) against the Russians.” Read more >

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