Posts Tagged ‘EPA Clean Power Plan’

What Does the Clean Power Plan Mean for Virginia? A Real Opportunity for Renewable Energy

, senior energy analyst

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe has recently said he “fully supports” the EPA’s Clean Power Plan, designed to reduce heat-trapping carbon emissions from existing power plants. The governor last month signed a suite of clean energy bills into law. Clean sources like renewable energy and energy efficiency can go a long way toward getting the state where it needs to be. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Peabody Energy, the EPA Clean Power Plan, and Corporate Consistency on Climate Change

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

I’ve talked a lot here about companies’ positions on climate change and how they do or don’t agree with other statements and actions companies take—from alignment with their trade group’s position, to looking at how they talk about their own climate risks, to taking a broader look at all company actions to help or inhibit progress on addressing climate change. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Lawyers for Coal

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Laurence Tribe – popularly known as “President Obama’s old law professor” – is testifying today against the Clean Power Plan before the House Subcommittee on Energy & Power, on behalf of Peabody Energy. But here he’s not acting as a teacher- he’s a lawyer fiercely advocating for his paying client.  We have a full preview of how he will distort the case against CO2 regulation from the comments he co-wrote with Peabody Energy on December 1, 2014. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

The Clean Power Plan is a Climate Game Changer. Here are Seven Ways to Strengthen it.

, lead economist and climate policy manager

Yesterday the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) submitted its comments on the draft Clean Power Plan (CPP) to the EPA. Joining millions of others, we registered our strong support for these historic, first-ever limits on carbon emissions from power plants, which are the single largest source of these emissions in the United States. This rule could be a climate game changer. We also recommended a number of ways the plan should be strengthened and improved, especially by increasing renewable energy contributions.
Read more >

Bookmark and Share