football


The World Cup and Concussions: Allowing Medical Evidence to Keep Soccer Players Safe

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

In the wake of the terrible decision to allow Uruguayan footballer Alvaro Pereria to continue playing after being knocked out by a knee to his head, a chorus is growing to empower independent doctors to determine whether a player is fit to return to the game. Read more >

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Uruguay Wins, Science Loses in the World Cup as Pereria Concussion Is Ignored

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

Uruguay beat England yesterday in the World Cup and most of the headlines were about the late go-ahead goal that sent the British players packing. Barely mentioned in the initial coverage were the grave mistakes made by everyone involved in the game when faced with a potentially significant brain injury. Read more >

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Has the NFL Covered Up Concussion and Brain Injury Research? And What Should Parents Think?

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

On February 17, 2011, former Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson, one of my childhood heroes, shot himself in the chest. In a text message to family, he strongly implied that he committed suicide in this way in order to preserve his brain for research into the long-term effects of traumatic brain injury. Read more >

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