fracking


We All Have Something to Contribute: Environmental Justice and the Importance of Place

, UCS Science Network

I have been a public health nurse for over 35 years! When I say it like that, sometimes I feel and know that I am getting old, very old. But it also makes me realize that I have accumulated a vast amount of experience and expertise, particularly when it comes to the community’s perspective on their health and environment and their resulting needs towards achieving a healthy community. Read more >

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Toward Science-Based Children’s Environmental Health Policies

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

Imagine a world where all children grow up playing, learning, and dreaming in communities free from violence, racism, poverty, hunger, life trauma, and poisons that limit their potential. Imagine their health and safety encompassing physical, mental, and social well-being—not just the absence of disease. Read more >

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Community-Driven Study Finds Unsafe Air Pollution Levels near Oil and Gas Facilities

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Ever think that your rural backyard could face air pollution levels in excess of 100 times EPA health standards?  Jeff and Rhonda Locker of Wyoming didn’t think so either. But a new peer-reviewed study out in Environmental Health today suggests that such spikes in air pollution in your backyard are possible if you live next to an oil and gas facility. Read more >

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Climate, Carbon, and Clarity

, UCS Science Network

I’m as passionate as anyone about the reality of climate change (no really, it’s real) and the need to adapt now to its threats and alleviate the major drivers. Yet, as our nation and its leaders narrow the debate around one particular cause, vital sign, metric, or goal, we fall short in truly protecting and preserving our world for future generations. Read more >

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The Colorado Oil and Gas Task Force: Still a Chance for Science to Inform Fracking Policy

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

When news broke last month that the state of Colorado would be creating a blue-ribbon task force to study the impacts and inform regulation of hydraulic fracturing in the state, I wrote about the opportunity for science. In a state that has been ground zero in the fracking debate in many ways, this is a chance, I wrote, for Colorado to take a step back and consider how science can better inform oil and gas development there. Unfortunately, yesterday’s announcement of the task force membership shows this has yet to be the case. Read more >

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