Global warming


Pie and Praise: Why I’m Especially Thankful for California’s Leadership on Climate This Thanksgiving

, Western states senior climate analyst

Following our annual pre-Thanksgiving tradition, my husband and I gathered with friends around a long wooden table on Sunday night to eat homemade pies and share what we’re thankful for this year. Some said family, others their health or jobs. Read more >

California Department of Water Resources
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Restoring U.S. Forests by Mid-Century

, scientific adviser, Climate and Energy

As both scientists (in many published papers) and political leaders (in the Paris Agreement) have now recognized, to stop global warming—to keep the global temperature from increasing indefinitely—we need to peak and then reduce emissions rapidly. We need to get our release of global warming pollution into the atmosphere, down to a level below the amount that carbon sequestration by the biosphere takes out of the atmosphere. This means that we have to work incredibly hard on two parallel tracks, simultaneously. On the one hand, cut pollution drastically. And on the other hand, regrow the biosphere. Read more >

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Obama in China: Lessons from the Red Carpet

, China project manager and senior analyst

President Obama’s precipitate decent onto a Chinese red carpet generated more media attention than what could be a planet-saving commitment to combat climate change. This triumph of the trivial raises important questions about the future of US-China relations.

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California Just Made Climate Change History. How Did it Happen?

, Western states policy manager

The day before yesterday I sat in the gallery of the California Senate and saw something that just a few weeks ago I wasn’t expecting: Senators casting the final vote on an historic set of bills—Senate Bill 32 (Pavley) and Assembly Bill 197 (E. Garcia)—that reaffirm the state’s commitment to addressing climate change through 2030. After the vote was over, my colleagues and I shared hugs, smiles, and tears as the weight of the accomplishment washed over us. It was a great day. Read more >

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Flooding, Extreme Weather, and Record Temperatures: How Global Warming Puts it All Together

, climate scientist

Even though Louisiana is not among the areas that has seen the most increase in heavy precipitation events, the Southeastern US has seen an increase of 27 percent from 1958 to 2012. The straightforward explanation for heavier downpours is that warmer air can contain more water vapor than cooler air. Indeed, global measurements show that there is more water vapor in the air now. It follows that there is more water to come down when it rains. Read more >

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