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Posts Tagged ‘Global warming’

Charles Mann and The Atlantic Miss The Mark in a Confused Climate Change Piece

A recent climate change article by Charles C. Mann in The Atlantic left me scratching my head. The title, “How to Talk About Climate Change So People Will Listen” piqued my interest. It’s something I grapple with every day. But instead of focusing on how our public conversations about climate change are shifting, he lingers on what he sees as failed efforts to enact national climate policy. Mann is a serious and respected writer — who happens to work with some of my favorite magazines — so this piece felt like a missed opportunity. Read More

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Hot Models Try to Forecast CO2 Reductions

A hot chase over models began soon after the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft CO2 rules June 2. Reducing CO2 (carbon-dioxide, the climate-altering pollution) in the electricity sector is not a mystery, but expecting too much from a model can be frustrating. With the CO2 rules, we have entered a new era, triggering a great clamoring amongst policymakers and advocates to get comfortable with the models. Temperatures are rising, and it is not just the hot summer weather. Read More

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CNN’s Climate Coverage Shows Signs of Improvement

Earlier this year, we released an analysis that examined cable news climate coverage from the top three networks. In 2013, CNN aired inaccurate statements about the science in 30 percent of its climate-change-related segments. Such misleading statements usually took place during debates about established science. Guests, including politicians and commentators, also made inaccurate statements about climate science that often went unchallenged. Read More

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Will Climate Change Embolden the Environmental Justice Movement?

Guest Bogger

Ramin Skibba, Assistant Project Scientist
Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego

San Diego, California

We are at an historic anniversary: the Civil Rights Act was enacted fifty years ago on July 2nd 1964. According to the legislation, all persons “shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of…any place of public accommodation, as defined in this section, without discrimination” based on race, color, religion, or national origin. Read More

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Climate Change is Turning up the Heat on July 4th in our National Parks

New research shows that more extreme climate conditions due to global warming are already affecting more than 250 national parks, including the Mojave National Preserve, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park and Mammoth Cave National Park. Recent temperatures at Grand Canyon National Park have been at the extreme end of historical averages. Read More

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10 Reasons, 5 Years: What’s Changed about Deforestation

From time to time we take a look at things we published several years ago, to see whether they’re still up to date. We often need to decide whether to reprint them as is, revise them first, or simply decide to stop using them. This requires figuring out whether the information they contain is still valid, or has become somewhat obsolete in light of new science and recent political developments. Read More

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Torrential Rain during the World Cup in Brazil, while the U.S. Midwest Floods

In the hours before yesterday’s World Cup football match between the U.S. and Germany, the Brazilian city of Recife was hit by a torrential downpour. A coastal city of 1.5 million people, Recife is used to high humidity and rainfall.  But with streets flooded to waist level in some places, players, officials and fans had a tough time even making it to the stadium for the game. Read More

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Behind the Curtain, Grid Operators Reveal Path to Reduce Carbon

The electric grid contains many mysteries, and we will have to master many of these to reduce carbon emissions. Fortunately, the independent grid operators are increasingly pulling back the curtain on renewable energy and coal plant retirements. And the view is great! Read More

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Successes in Reducing Deforestation and the Global Warming Pollution it Causes

I’m now in Bonn at the United Nations climate negotiations, where the big news is that in the last week the world’s two biggest emitters – China and the United States – have announced important actions to cut their carbon pollution, especially from the coal that they burn. These steps are welcome, but they are plans, not accomplishments, and they come late compared to other countries that have already acted to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions.

Ironically, most of these successes are in tropical developing countries, where countries’ reductions in rates of deforestation and in some cases their reforestation of cleared land have cut their net emissions of global warming pollution. Their actions have already accomplished more for the climate than the actions of many developed nations have.

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Climate, Communities of Color, and Connections: Interview with Audrey Peterman

Guest Bogger

Audrey Peterman, President and Co-founder of Earthwise Productions, Inc.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

“Because I know these stories I am wholly unable to sit quietly by or to lend my energies to the induced apathy from which our country suffers. The elevation of Fort Monroe to the status of National Monument gives us a window into our natural and cultural heritage and shows us our connectedness as a nation…I fervently hope that the Fort Monroe story inspires us to wake up and address the most pressing threat faced by our generation – climate change.” Audrey Peterman Read More

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