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Posts Tagged ‘Hurricane Sandy’

A Science-Informed Post-Sandy Resilience Plan, but Hoboken Faces Challenges Implementing It

Last August, Dawn Zimmer, mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey, formally released the Hoboken Resiliency and Readiness Plan to address ongoing Hurricane Sandy rebuilding efforts. The plan marked an important milestone for the “Mile Square City” by establishing a strong set of science-informed policy objectives that would help protect citizens from future climate change impacts. Read More

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Lessons from Hurricane Sandy for Flood Risk and Flood Insurance

Hurricane Sandy caused record flooding along the coasts of New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, much of it resulting from storm surge. Sea level rise means that these kinds of storm surges are now riding on elevated water levels so that their destructive power extends higher and farther inland. Coupled with growing population and development along our coasts, major storms are creating increased risk for coastal residents – and threatening the financial solvency of the taxpayer-backed National Flood Insurance Program. Read More

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Satellites, Storm Surge, and Sandy: The Need for Science to Inform Our Coastal Planning

The following is an accurate description of Sandy, the superstorm that tore through the northeastern United States almost one year ago:

Sandy slammed into the New Jersey Coast Monday night, bringing very heavy rain and damaging winds to the region. Read More

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Human Nature and Creeping Environmental Threats

Guest Bogger

Kenny Broad, Professor, Marine Affairs and Policy
University of Miami

Miami, FL

To state the obvious, rare events don’t occur frequently. While this is good in the case of large-scale natural hazards, it may increase our vulnerability in the long run. But why do uncommon events increase our likelihood of taking unnecessary risks, and how do we overcome our own cognitive predispositions? Read More

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A Difficult Conversation: How to Prevent Power Outages in Coastal Communities

When we talk about the electricity supply in this country, we confront a generational transition. As coastal communities repair and improve their electric grids to better face rising waters and powerful storms, they are caught in a realization: We are using the same gear our grandfathers used to keep the lights on. It is time to recognize how new things like solar panels, smart meters, and heating and cooling improvements can contribute to the grid in times of stress, and every other day. It is time for the 21st century to reconsider the 19th century design of the centralized, one-way grid. Read More

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Science and Superstorm Sandy, One Year Later: Looking to the Future

Over the past year, UCS experts have shared knowledge of the consequences of sea level rise on coastal communities, convened leaders to discuss risks and evaluate appropriate responses, and analyzed problems with America’s flood insurance system. This month, we mark the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy with a forum at Monmouth University (you can attend in person or online), part of the Lewis M. Branscomb Forum series. Read More

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Rising Seas and Worsening Storms Require Rethinking Flood and Wind Insurance

In a world with rising seas and worsening storms, we’ve got to get smarter about how and where we build along our coasts. A new UCS report released today points out that our government-backed flood and wind insurance programs are encouraging risky coastal development that exposes coastal communities to harm and creates the potential for large damage costs paid for by all taxpayers. Local examples of policies that create risk are unfortunately common too: recently, New Jersey policy makers passed a bill that would allow development on piers in coastal high hazard areas, putting more people and property in harm’s way. Read More

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13 of the Largest Power Outages in History — and What They Tell Us About the 2003 Northeast Blackout

What gets the most attention is not what causes blackouts in North America and Europe. It’s the system, not a shortage of power plants that is the problem. Take a look at the 13 major power outages over many years, and see that the problems we face are not because we aren’t building enough power plants. Part one of a two-part series on the Northeast Blackout of 2003. Read More

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Ready or Not: Hurricane Season in a Warming World

Here on the East Coast, the arrival of hurricane season means something very different in 2013 than ever before. It reminds us: catastrophes like Hurricane Sandy are possible. It warns us: if you’re on the coast, you could face grave risk. And it asks: are you ready? Read More

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Preparing for Our Future: The Need for Monitoring and Data Collection

Last week I attended the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Science Policy conference with this year’s theme of “Preparing for our Future.” The second annual conference seeks to bridge the gap between science and policy (a mission UCS strongly believes in). I learned a lot of new information about policy on diverse scientific topics—from ocean acidification to carbon sequestration to asteroids impacting Earth—but one thing I learned really took me by surprise. Read More

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