Posts Tagged ‘Hurricane Sandy’

Clean Energy Microgrids, Storage, and Building Grid Resilience

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

The significant impacts of power outages are driving interest and technology innovation to provide electric power in a sustainable manner, even when the grid is damaged. An approach that’s growing in popularity and is becoming increasingly cost-effective is to combine solar plus storage to provide this added layer of reliability. Read more >

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A Science-Informed Post-Sandy Resilience Plan, but Hoboken Faces Challenges Implementing It

, democracy analyst, Center for Science & Democracy

Last August, Dawn Zimmer, mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey, formally released the Hoboken Resiliency and Readiness Plan to address ongoing Hurricane Sandy rebuilding efforts. The plan marked an important milestone for the “Mile Square City” by establishing a strong set of science-informed policy objectives that would help protect citizens from future climate change impacts. Read more >

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Lessons from Hurricane Sandy for Flood Risk and Flood Insurance

, lead economist and climate policy manager

Hurricane Sandy caused record flooding along the coasts of New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, much of it resulting from storm surge. Sea level rise means that these kinds of storm surges are now riding on elevated water levels so that their destructive power extends higher and farther inland. Coupled with growing population and development along our coasts, major storms are creating increased risk for coastal residents – and threatening the financial solvency of the taxpayer-backed National Flood Insurance Program. Read more >

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Satellites, Storm Surge, and Sandy: The Need for Science to Inform Our Coastal Planning

, lead analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

The following is an accurate description of Sandy, the superstorm that tore through the northeastern United States almost one year ago:

Sandy slammed into the New Jersey Coast Monday night, bringing very heavy rain and damaging winds to the region. Read more >

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Human Nature and Creeping Environmental Threats

, UCS Science Network

To state the obvious, rare events don’t occur frequently. While this is good in the case of large-scale natural hazards, it may increase our vulnerability in the long run. But why do uncommon events increase our likelihood of taking unnecessary risks, and how do we overcome our own cognitive predispositions? Read more >

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