New Mexico


The Conspicuous Absence of Climate Change in New Mexico’s State Water Planning

, senior climate scientist

One might expect a state like New Mexico, where water is such a precious resource, to pay close attention to climate projections and to plan carefully for its future water security. Unfortunately, this does not appear to be the case. Read more >

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New Analysis Shows the Benefits of a Clean Energy Future in New Mexico

, director of state policy & analysis, Clean Energy

New Mexico has the potential to be a national leader in the rapidly growing clean energy economy. Read more >

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Climate Change is Putting Iconic Historic Sites and National Parks at Growing Risk

, , deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

Heading into the Memorial Day weekend, like most people in America, my thoughts usually begin to turn to summer vacation. But this year it’s different. I’m pre-occupied with the alarming threat climate change impacts — especially wildfires and coastal flooding — poses to some of our most important and iconic historic sites and national parks. Read more >

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Early Wildfire Season in New Mexico Starts as U.S. Considers New Funding Sources to Fight Extreme Wildfires

, , senior climate scientist

I experienced very dry conditions in the mountains of northern New Mexico a few weeks back. I spoke with someone who travels to Taos nearly every winter and this was the least snow he could remember. The fire risk sign said “low” in the surrounding forests, but if more snow did not come soon I suspected those signs would start nudging to the yellow and red colors that warn of fire risk. Unfortunately, fires have already erupted in New Mexico this February. Some officials say that if 2014 continues to be the sixth year in a row with drier-than-average conditions on New Mexico’s Rio Grande, this would be the longest dry stretch since before the Rio Grande river gauges existed. Read more >

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Bigger, Hotter, and Longer Wildfires are the New Normal as the Climate Changes in the West

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

Climate change is a main driving force behind the huge uptick of dangerous wildfires the western U.S. has been experiencing during the last decade — and this year is no exception. In terms of total acreage burned, the eight worst wildfire seasons since 1960 have all occurred in the last 12 yearsRead more >

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