Obama administration scientific integrity issues


The EPA Withdraws Claim that Fracking has no “Widespread Systemic Impacts” on Drinking Water

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

The EPA removed language claiming that hydraulic fracturing has no “widespread systemic impacts” on drinking water from its final report on the subject. The move follows criticism from its Science Advisory Board and revelations by Marketplace that the report’s executive summary and press release may have been edited by non-scientists. Read more >

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Science and the Politics of Fracking—and What’s Ahead

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

Yesterday, (and then again this morning) Marketplace reported that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) downplayed scientists’ concerns about the impact of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water in a draft assessment published in June 2015. Read more >

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How Is the USDA Doing on Scientific Integrity?

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

In March 2013, the US Department of Agriculture updated its scientific integrity policy, a policy mandated by the Obama Administration for all federal agencies with a significant focus on science. Along with 22 other agencies and departments, the USDA developed a policy in 2011 that the Union of Concerned Scientists assessed to “not make adequate commitments to scientific integrity.” How does the revised policy measure up and does it appear to be working? Read more >

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What’s Been Going On with the EPA’s Fracking Report?

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

During Sunday’s Democratic presidential debate in Flint, Michigan, Sarah Bellaire, a student at the University of Michigan at Dearborn, asked the candidates if they support fracking. Read more >

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Searching for Scientific Integrity in the Dietary Guidelines Report Process

, food systems & health analyst

Last Friday, on behalf of the Union of Concerned Scientists, I testified at the USDA about the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The USDA invited stakeholders to comment on the process for developing the next Dietary Guidelines for Americans—which are updated every five years. Our comments centered around scientific integrity and the need to protect agency scientists from political interference. Read more >

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