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Posts Tagged ‘organic’

Blind Faith vs. Insight: Employing Media Literacy to Reject Policies that Harm Human Health

Guest Bogger

Melinda Hemmelgarn, Registered Dietitian
Food Sleuth Radio, KOPN

Columbia, MO

As a dietitian who attempts to connect the dots between food, health and agriculture, my first job is to help my audiences think ecologically—to understand ripple effects—or how one influences others. Read More

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How a (Farm) Bill Became a Law

Much has been written about the ugly sausage-making of the just-ended farm bill process: the abandoned opportunity to truly reform the nation’s farm subsidy system, the cynical refusal to deny subsidies to millionaire farmers, and the 4 percent of food stamp beneficiaries who ultimately took it on the chin. But now that President Obama has signed the thing into law, it’s worth reviewing a number of real and meaningful wins that UCS and its allies and supporters achieved in this bill. And also noting that our work isn’t done. Read More

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The Misguided Attack on Organically-Grown Foods – Beyond Oz and EPA

There has been a running, and often misguided, debate about the value of organic farming over the past few months. Read More

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USDA Says Organic Farming Worth $3.5 Billion…Happy Food Day!

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture quietly announced that the nation’s certified organic farmers enjoyed sales of more than $3.5 billion in 2011. On this second annual Food Day—a nationwide celebration of healthy, affordable, sustainable food—it seems fitting to highlight this “good news” story that hasn’t received much attention. Read More

Categories: Food and Agriculture  

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Many Good Reasons to “Eat Local”

As an analyst and communicator at UCS, I know how difficult it can be to tell a complicated, nuanced story in our sound-bite-oriented media culture. So even though it was not totally surprising, it was still frustrating to find UCS’s position on the benefits of local foods mischaracterized last week in a USA Today article that called local food “trendy,” but asked whether it is “really more eco-friendly.” Read More

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Five Good Reasons to Eat Food (and One Not-So-Good One)

For most of my life I never thought much about what I ate. Generally I’ve been dependent on others – first my mother, now my wife – for good meals. My foraging philosophy has been simple: When I feel hungry, I search for something close at hand and do whatever is necessary to make it edible. Like the Checkers ad says, “ya gotta eat,” so I do.

However, in the last few years I’ve started to think about what I eat, and why. Read More

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Weed Resistance Costs Farmers Millions

Reuters’ Carey Gillam’s recent excellent analysis of the Roundup-resistant weed problem makes points that my colleagues at UCS have been arguing for a long time.

Overuse of any herbicide—such as we have seen with the widespread adoption of Monsanto’s genetically engineered Roundup-resistant crops—leads inevitably to the development of resistance. Read More

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A Bite of the Big (local, organic) Apple

Last weekend I took my mother, visiting the East Coast from California, on her first-ever jaunt to New York City. We had a ball, wandering the urban canyons, taking in a Tony-winning Broadway show, shopping at the fabulous Union Square Greenmarket, and of course, eating ourselves silly. Read More

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Biodiversity: It’s Not Just about Pandas and Polar Bears

As I slogged into my garden, soaked by recent tropical storms and hurricane Irene, and pushed back the leaves of my zucchini plants, the wild bumblebee emerging from one of the flowers reminded me that I wasn’t doing all of the work in this plot of vegetables. Read More

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Will Genetic Engineering Divert Us from Essential Food Production Science?

Climate change, increasing population, greater demand for animal products, and the un-sustainability of current food production: All will challenge our ability to produce enough food in coming decades. Read More

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