ozone


Why You Should Be Paying Attention to the Upcoming Budget Fight

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

When it comes to Congress, we know that budgets are about more than just money. Back in April, I warned that we shouldn’t let the federal budget process become a playground for special interests. Basically, with little to no debate, policymakers will exploit the process and attempt to sneak in harmful, ideological provisions that undermine the use of science in the policymaking process and help rig the system for special interests. Read more >

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Photo: Kai Schreiber./CC BY-SA (Flickr)

The Budget Process Shouldn’t Be a Playground for Special Interests

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

It’s appropriations season in Congress. And that means special interests. Read more >

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A Holiday “Gift” We Could Do Without

, sr. Washington rep., Center for Science & Democracy

To most of us, December is a time for cookies, gifts and holiday parties. But if your job is advocating for science and democracy in Washington, D.C., the month of December is far less cheery: This is the time for a budget showdown. Read more >

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Here’s What Will Happen with the EPA Ozone Rule

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Sometime in the next few weeks, the EPA will release its long awaited final rule on ambient ground-level ozone. It hasn’t happened yet, but there are some clues as to what the agency will do and how others will react.  Here’s how I see it going down and what that means for the country.  Read more >

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Ozone in Houston: Combatting Misinformation and Protecting Public Health

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

As I’ve been following, the Environmental Protection Agency is in the process of updating the national ambient air quality standard for ozone pollution. The standard is likely to be strengthened below the current standard of 75 ppb, due to the compelling scientific evidence linking ozone to adverse health impacts at this concentration. The EPA has proposed a standard between 65 and 70 ppb, narrowing the range advised by its independent science committee of 60-70 ppb, and the agency will issue a final rule by October. Read more >

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