Scientific Integrity


Five Black Public Health Champions You Should Know

, Food Systems & Health Analyst

In honor of National Public Health Week, we’re paying tribute to some outstanding individuals in the public health field. But first—bear with me—a little historical context. Read more >

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Mr. Pruitt has denied a long-standing petition by public interest groups to restrict the use of pesticides containing chlorpyrifos, a chemical whose health impacts include long-term, irreversible effects on children’s brain development. Photo: Wikimedia

EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Ignores the Science on Pesticides, Puts Children at Risk

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Yesterday, Mr. Pruitt denied a long-standing petition by public interest groups to restrict the use of pesticides containing chlorpyrifos, a chemical whose health impacts include long-term, irreversible effects on children’s brain development Read more >

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How’s EPA’s Science Advice Process Doing? Celebrating Sunshine and Progress at the EPA

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Happy sunshine week! It’s a week to celebrate one of the pillars of our democracy: access to information. This year’s sunshine week seems especially important because of the current Administration’s open hostility toward the media, which has been shining a light on the federal government’s operations day in and day out and illustrating the clear conflicts of interest of the corporate cabinet. Read more >

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UCS staff Standing Up for Science, Copley Square, Boston, February 2017

Stand Up for Science: 5 Ways Scientists Can Make Their Voices Heard

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

As the Trump Administration and the new Congress have gotten down to work, there is a lot of chaos and confusion. But there are a few clear themes. Read more >

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Advancing Scientific Integrity Through Federal Advisory Committees

, science and policy analyst, Center for Science and Democracy

Back in October, I provided a comment at a public meeting for a National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) advisory committee that was set up to review the process to update the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Their first charge was to write a report with recommendations on how the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) selection process could be improved to provide more transparency, minimize bias, and include committee members with a range of viewpoints. Read more >

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