Solar Access for All


Bright Spots in Solar in the Election’s Aftermath

, senior analyst, Clean Energy

Sure, the outcome of the election has raised questions about how the President-elect and his team will impact the country’s transition to a cleaner, healthier, and safer electricity system. But regardless of how the politics du jour feel about renewables, the science has not changed: generating electricity from renewables like wind and solar does not cause pollution that harms our health or our planet. Read more >

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Community Solar: Making Solar Accessible without Rooftops

, director of state policy & analysis, Clean Energy

Community solar is a powerful and effective tool for increasing access to the solar revolution. That’s one of the key takeaways from research recently completed by UCS’s 2016 Schneider Fellow, Thazin. For nearly 15 years, UCS has participated in Stanford University’s Schneider Fellowship Program, which pairs talented students with national nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to work on issues in support of sustainable energy. The dispatch below—penned by Thazin—summarizes her work on the exciting role that community solar can play in the transition to a clean energy economy. Read more >

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What Does “Clean Energy Access for All” Mean in the Context of a Dangerous Heat Wave?

, lead economist and climate policy manager

The Obama administration has set some exciting goals to help ensure that the benefits of transitioning to clean energy accrue to all. Read more >

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What Solar + Energy Storage Can Do For Tenants and Owners of Affordable Housing

, senior analyst, Clean Energy

A solar photovoltaic (PV) system and battery storage together can result in significant savings over solar-only installations Read more >

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“Solar for All”: How Utilities Can Increase Access to Solar Energy

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

A new report looks at what utilities can do to “bring solar within reach” for a broader swath of U.S. households, particularly in lower-income areas and communities of color. The answer: a lot. Read more >

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