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Posts Tagged ‘sustainability’

Testifying about Sustainability and the American Diet

The day before yesterday, together with my UCS colleagues Lindsey Haynes-Maslow and Deborah Bailin, I went to the National Institutes of Health to testify on the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. This report, prepared by a committee of experts every five years, provides the basic information for federal food programs such as school lunches and SNAP (formerly called food stamps), and is used to create the official U.S. Dietary Guidelines that are the basis for the MyPlate graphics.

Lindsey, Deborah and I testified about different aspects of the DGAC report, and they have already put their testimony up on their blogs. Here is mine, which focuses on food sustainability issues such as the climate impacts of the American diet.
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In Support of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s Report

This morning, I woke up bright and early to allow for an extra long metro ride to the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.  I met two other UCS researchers outside the station. We walked together to the public hearing on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s scientific report with one consistent message: that we support the committee’s recommendations. Below is a copy of my testimony.

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The Problem with the Environmental Movement

Guest Bogger

Alexis Goggans
M.S., Interdisciplinary Sustainability Studies

Washington, DC

Believe it or not, I wasn’t always an environmentalist. In fact, I didn’t know about composting or environmental justice until I was 19 years old. I often tell people with a precarious smile that it was my undergraduate studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder that turned me into the person I am today. But my journey to full-blown New Age hippy didn’t start with “save the whale” protests or “save the rainforest” campaigns. It began with environmental justice.  Read More

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You Are What You Eat—And What It Eats Too

Guest Bogger

Liz Carlisle
Fellow, Center for Diversified Farming Systems

Berkeley, CA

A dozen years ago, a New York Times Magazine article titled “Power Steer” changed the way Americans thought about meat. “We are what we eat, it is often said,” wrote author Michael Pollan, “but of course that is only part of the story. We are what what we eat eats too.” Read More

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CVS, Tobacco, and Aligning Companies’ Actions with Their Sustainability Brands on Climate Change

This week I am at the GreenBiz Conference, an annual meeting of leaders in sustainable business, many from the world’s top companies. One of the discussion topics that keeps coming up is values—specifically, the need to align company operations with their corporate values around sustainability. But what does this mean in practice? Read More

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Best of Both Worlds: Preserving Agriculture on the Urban Fringe

Guest Bogger

Eric Christianson, MS Iowa State University
Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture and MCRP Community and Regional Planning

Ames, Iowa

Growing up the son of a corn and bean farmer in northern Illinois, I remember my parents talking jealously about a neighbor who received a generous offer from a developer for his farmland. It seemed a great fortune to me for farmers to be able to profit so handsomely from the expansion of cities. Read More

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Corn Belt Farmers Respond to Climate Change

Guest Bogger

Gabrielle Roesch, PhD Student
Iowa State University, Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Sociology

Ames, Iowa

My family’s direct ties to the land ended generations ago, yet I have been drawn to agriculture, food production and the broader issues of natural resource management since I was a child. It likely started picking raspberries for my grandmother on Long Island, and was further fueled by a food security fellowship in Zambia and Ethiopia. Read More

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How Rocket Science Can Benefit Transportation

Guest Bogger

Michael Wright, NASA engineer

Glen Rock, PA

As a NASA engineer and father of three, there are two things that I consider important: space exploration and climate change. Unfortunately, neither space nor climate change are receiving the attention they deserve from policy makers and the public. Fortunately, my 30-year career at NASA has given me the opportunity to become involved in both. Read More

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Fight Global Warming at Work: Show Your Boss the Money

All of the authors on the team are blogging about the findings in our new book, Cooler Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living.  So today I’m turning this space over to my colleague and one of the book’s authors, Suzanne Shaw.

Suzanne Shaw, Director of Communications, Union of Concerned Scientists – When you suggest changes that can help your workplace save money, people are likely to listen. And as we demonstrate in our new book, reducing global warming emissions can produce big savings. Here’s what you need to know to encourage your employer along an energy-efficient, low-carbon path. Read More

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Two Cents on Two Wheels: Bike Sharing Makes Traveling for Work Easy

I travel regularly to scientific conferences for work and often contemplate whether I should stay farther away from the convention center to save UCS some cash. While places like New York and San Francisco have great public transportation, though, other metropolitan areas make commuting without a car considerably more time consuming.

But thanks to new bike share programs popping up in cities around the country, that decision is becoming easier and easier, as I found out this week in the Twin Cities (home of my alma mater) where I spoke at the Geological Society of America meeting. Read More

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