water


Anchorage Event a Great Warm-Up for Fort Lauderdale

, UCS Science Network

While the Arctic Council normally meets at a table with only eight chairs, the US has invited world leaders, researchers, and media to a party that promises to be standing room only. Read more >

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Proof that California’s Water Sector Can Be a Climate Leader: Sonoma County Celebrates “Carbon-Free” Water

, climate scientist

Today, I am at the Sonoma County Water Agency celebrating the achievement of their goal to provide “carbon-free water.” That means that no fossil fuels are burned in order to provide water services (including capturing, cleaning, and delivering drinking water to taps along with treating wastewater). This achievement is a powerful proof of concept, showing how the water sector can be a part of the state’s ambitious climate efforts. Read more >

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Where Is the Wastewater Going? How Better Data Can Make Us More Resilient

, UCS Science Network

According to the United Nations, up to 90 percent of the developing world’s wastewater does not get treated before it goes back into the environment. That’s a staggering statistic, especially considering the implications of untreated wastewater and the huge importance of good water management today. Read more >

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West Virginia Scientists to EPA, CDC: Allow Your Scientists to Speak

, program manager, Center for Science & Democracy

UPDATE: See responses below from CDC and EPA officials.

This morning, two dozen West Virginia scientists wrote to the CDC and EPA to urge the two agencies to give more freedom to their scientists to communicate with the press and public, especially during emergencies like the ongoing water contamination crisis affecting hundreds of thousands of West Virginians. Read more >

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The Hidden Costs of “Cheap” Electricity in West Virginia

, senior energy analyst

Today, residents of nine West Virginia counties—including my parents—are without water because of a spill from a chemical storage container near a water treatment plant on the Elk River in Charleston. The spill affected some 200,000 people, who were advised to avoid using their tap water for drinking, cooking, cleaning, even bathing. Read more >

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